Scholar

Stories Our Grandparents Told Us

By: Lenora Hayes   Eugenie Almeida  

This is a research project conducted using critical discourse analysis to study themes and patterns of discourse in African American and Hispanic American student essays about stories they were told by their family. We found that nine themes characterized African American student essays. There was some overlap between African American and Hispanic American discourse about stories they were told by their family but there were major differences between African American student discourse and Hispanic American student discourse about stories they were told by their family.

"Critical Discourse Analysis", " African American", " Hispanic American", " Themes", " Stories"
Critical Cultural Studies
Paper Presentation in a Themed Session



Lenora Hayes

Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, Languages and Cultures, Fayetteville State University, United States
North Carolina, United States

Education: Dr. Lenora M. Hayes earned an Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of South Carolina in 2012. She earned a M.A.T. in Spanish from the University of Georgia in 2003; and, she graduated with a Licenciatura in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) from the Universidad de Panama in 2000. Experience: Dr. Hayes is currently the assistant chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures at Fayetteville State University. She was the coordinator for the intermediate level Spanish courses at the University of South Carolina from 2005 until 2009. She has taught Spanish courses at the University of South Carolina, Midlands Technical College, Columbia College, and Benedict College in Columbia, SC. In addition, she taught high school Spanish in the state of South Carolina for three years. Areas of research interest: Dr. Hayes' research areas of interest are action research in Foreign Language teaching methods and classroom dynamics, foreign language curriculum articulation across levels, and issues in diversity and multicultural education. Service: Dr. Hayes is currently the faculty adviser for contributors to the Spanish page in the Fayetteville State University student newspaper The Voice. She is also the faculty adviser for the FSU Hispanic Club. Awards: 2016 - 2017 Department Teacher of the Year Award 2014 - 2015 Departmental Service Award for the Department of World Languages and Cultures 2013 - 2014 Faculty Advisor of the year for the Department of World Languages and Cultures.


Dr. Eugenie Almeida

Professor, Department of Communication, Languages and Cultures, Fayetteville State University, United States
-, United States

Eugenie Almeida received her PH. D. in Communication from the University of Buffalo in 1991. Her dissertation research was entitled, "Facuality in Newspaper Discourse" and was published in Text as an article, entitled, "Categories of Factuality in News Discourse," With her husband and colleague, Michael J. Almeida, a professor of computer science, she then develped a partial computerization of her category system. She continued doing research on news discourse, exploring other discourse structures routinely used by American newspapers. These investigations were presented at numerous conferences, including the National Communication Association, Eastern Communication Association, International Communication Association and Southern States Communication Association. In the late 1990's, she turned her attention to the area of communication competence, and, after presenting several conference paper, published her new research in Communication Education and the International Journal of Learning. For the past five years, she has been investigating how the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has been portrayed by American newspapers.