Structuration Theory and Social Capital

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  • Title: Structuration Theory and Social Capital: A Qualitative Case Study of Organic Producer Groups in Southern Thailand
  • Author(s): Ratchada Ruangsarakul, Viyouth Chamruspanth, Keeratiporn Jutaviriya
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Interdisciplinary Social Sciences
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies
  • Keywords: Commodity Commercial, Organic Producer Groups, Social Capital, Structuration Theory, Thailand
  • Volume: 14
  • Issue: 2
  • Year: 2019
  • ISSN: 2324-7576 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2324-7584 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2324-7576/CGP/v14i02/13-26
  • Citation: Ruangsarakul, Ratchada , Viyouth Chamruspanth, and Keeratiporn Jutaviriya. 2019. "Structuration Theory and Social Capital: A Qualitative Case Study of Organic Producer Groups in Southern Thailand." The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies 14 (2): 13-26. doi:10.18848/2324-7576/CGP/v14i02/13-26.
  • Extent: 14 pages

Abstract

Thailand is transitioning to organic agriculture with greater proportion of Thai farmers choosing organic; there are more acres being cultivated compared to other countries whose member states of the Economic Community of Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN). Some of the most interesting recent claims regarding organic systems are quality, negotiation in marketing, and production activities. There have, however, only been structured pathways to producer groups which are potentially moving towards more sustainable marketing and customer perception. The purpose of this study is to build earlier insights from a view of structuration theory and social capital. It explores the effect of negotiation on the principles of production between structure, capitalist groups, and organic producers in southern Thailand. Using a bracketing qualitative method, data were collected through in-depth interviews with fifteen participants in Phatthalung province from 2016 to 2017. It found that organic groups have strong network ties, trust, and connection, leading to better negotiations regarding production activities. Despite support from middlemen (structure), educational institutions, and community enterprises, active engagement with producer groups is required. The findings also suggest supporting the organic groups with structure rather than practice may help develop more sustainable organic groups.