Multiple Diversity Dimensions and Organizational Climate

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  • Title: Multiple Diversity Dimensions and Organizational Climate: Faculty and Staff Perceptions about Agency, Resistance, Marginalization, and University Leadership
  • Author(s): Elizabeth Stork
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Organizational Diversity
  • Keywords: Diversity, Organizational Climate, Agency, Marginalization, Universities, Survey Methods
  • Volume: 19
  • Issue: 1
  • Year: 2019
  • ISSN: 2328-6261 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2328-6229 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2328-6261/CGP/v19i01/29-44
  • Citation: Stork, Elizabeth . 2019. "Multiple Diversity Dimensions and Organizational Climate: Faculty and Staff Perceptions about Agency, Resistance, Marginalization, and University Leadership." The International Journal of Organizational Diversity 19 (1): 29-44. doi:10.18848/2328-6261/CGP/v19i01/29-44.
  • Extent: 16 pages

Abstract

What do universities know about their employees in terms of how they perceive the institution, the place where they hope for job satisfaction, opportunity, acceptance, and a positive working environment? When tackling the diversification of an organization, what should administrators know about how their employees perceive the climate? The purpose of the present study was to measure perceptions of employees at a particular institution that mirrored the student and regional population to learn about how they understand and experience diversity, what it means to and for them; their own experiences with marginalization, acceptance, and opportunity at the university; and beliefs about the diversity of the organization as a whole and how university leaders appear to appreciate it.. A survey was completed by 70 percent of faculty and 30 percent of staff, a sample of 320, at a small private Midwestern university. Findings suggest that perceived diversity dimensions varied by a person’s belonging to a majority or minority. Faculty and staff felt accepted, that they have opportunities and seldom felt marginalized, and that the leaders are on board with just and right actions. However, of the entire sample, nearly half felt they are treated differently than others. Findings are presented as well as an argument about the trends and non-reflective actions one university took to be on board with diversification.