Evolution of Higher Education Organizational Subcultures foll ...

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  • Title: Evolution of Higher Education Organizational Subcultures following Changes to Structure Systems: Results from a Longitudinal Study in Hungary
  • Author(s): Nick Chandler, Balazs Heidrich, Richard Kasa
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Organization Studies
  • Journal Title: Organizational Cultures: An International Journal
  • Keywords: Organizational Culture, Subculture, Longitudinal, Higher Education
  • Volume: 18
  • Issue: 2
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2327-8013 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2327-932X (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2327-8013/CGP/v18i02/53-69
  • Citation: Chandler, Nick, Balazs Heidrich, and Richard Kasa. 2018. "Evolution of Higher Education Organizational Subcultures following Changes to Structure Systems: Results from a Longitudinal Study in Hungary." Organizational Cultures: An International Journal 18 (2): 53-69. doi:10.18848/2327-8013/CGP/v18i02/53-69.
  • Extent: 17 pages

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore the changing nature of subcultures in a higher education institution. We undertook quantitative studies in 2011 and at the end of 2016 with the aim of identifying subcultures and changing values and perceptions over time. Our sample covered all employees of the organization. Our findings highlight the dynamic nature of subcultures as one subculture has disappeared, a new type has emerged, and the largest subculture has changed from a market to clan culture type. Despite these changes, subcultural perceptions of the organization have remained unchanged over time, indicating potential consequences for any future planned change, as well as employer branding and employee retention. Furthermore, members’ perceptions are found to diversify significantly within subcultures following the period of change (i.e., there is greater heterogeneity within subcultures), which has implications for higher education institutions (HEIs) facing continuous change. The complexity of culture is highlighted as subcultures continue to exhibit signs of both heterogeneity and homogeneity. Our theoretical model also results in the finding that subcultures are distinguished not only by different values but also by the strength of similar values.