What the Believer Should Know about Beliefs Associated With God

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  • Title: What the Believer Should Know about Beliefs Associated With God
  • Author(s): Tennyson Samraj
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Religion in Society
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society
  • Keywords: Belief, Believer, Intentionality, Swinburne, Plantinga, Explicability, Consciousness, God
  • Volume: 9
  • Issue: 1
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2154-8633 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2154-8641 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2154-8633/CGP/v09i01/1-11
  • Citation: Samraj, Tennyson . 2018. "What the Believer Should Know about Beliefs Associated With God." The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society 9 (1): 1-11. doi:10.18848/2154-8633/CGP/v09i01/1-11.
  • Extent: 11 pages

Abstract

To believe in God is to understand “what is said” (de dicto) in the context of why “what is said” is believed to be true. The “truth” of what we believe about God is important only in the context of understanding the “truth” of why we choose to believe in God. Anselm posits that the concept of God is definable, Plantinga purports that belief in God is warranted and Swinburne postulates that though the de re essence of God is inexplicable the de dicto understanding of God is both explicable and believable. This article attempts to define what the believer who believes in God must know about beliefs related to God. They are fourfold: first, God’s essence is explicable. The intentionality of consciousness allows us to be cognizant of both contingent and non-contingent beings, which provides the basis for belief in God. Second, God’s essence is definable. “Access Consciousness” allows us to explicate the de dicto basis for the existence and essence of God, even though the de re essence of God or the factual necessity of God is inexplicable. Third, the essence of God is believable. Explicability of why we choose to believe provides us the de dicto basis for “what” we believe about God. Fourth, while both what is explicable and inexplicable about God is believable, a decision for or against the concept of God is required, because the de re existence of God is not identifiable and the de re essence of God is inexplicable.