The Relations between Personal Epistemology and Learning Appr ...

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  • Title: The Relations between Personal Epistemology and Learning Approaches in Sociocultural Contexts: A Theoretical Conceptualization
  • Author(s): Huy P. Phan, Jack Maebuta, Jeremy Dorovolomo
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: The Learner
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Learning: Annual Review
  • Keywords: Learning, Learning Approaches, Sociocultural Contexts, Personal Epistemology, Historical Origin
  • Volume: 17
  • Issue: 5
  • Year: 2010
  • ISSN: 1447-9494 (Print)
  • ISSN: 1447-9540 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/1447-9494/CGP/v17i05/47033
  • Citation: Phan, Huy P., Jack Maebuta, and Jeremy Dorovolomo. 2010. "The Relations between Personal Epistemology and Learning Approaches in Sociocultural Contexts: A Theoretical Conceptualization." The International Journal of Learning: Annual Review 17 (5): 465-478. doi:10.18848/1447-9494/CGP/v17i05/47033.
  • Extent: 14 pages

Abstract

This theoretical article attempts to examine the interrelation between individuals’ epistemological beliefs and their approaches to learning in sociocultural settings. The seminal work published by Marton and Säljo in the 1970s, and the research studies conducted subsequently by others (Biggs, 1987; Phan & Deo, 2007; Simons, Dewitte, & Lens, 2004; Watkins & Regmi, 1990) establish a theoretical understanding into the approaches to learning that individuals may adopt in their studying. More recently, however, a number of theorists (Mugler & Landbeck, 1997; Phan, 2008) have attempted to situate individuals’ approach to learning in sociocultural contexts. In the area of personal epistemology, research studies (Hofer, 2004; Hofer & Pintrich, 1997; Phan, 2008) have similarly provided evidence to indicate the importance of epistemology in learning and academic achievement. Amalgamating these two lines of inquiry within one theoretical framework, the focus then is concerned with the quest to relate individuals’ learning approaches dialectically to the constituents of knowledge and the notion of knowing. For example, it is warranted to suggest that personal philosophical beliefs concerning the concepts of knowledge and learning dictate how one approaches his/her learning. In this theoretical examination, we discuss this intricate relationship and provide suggestions for continuing research in this area of inquiry. One fundamental aspect, which we argue in this discussion, is the notion that both personal epistemology and learning approaches are embedded culturally and historically.