The Forest as a Future Ecology for Twentieth-Century Retail L ...

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  • Title: The Forest as a Future Ecology for Twentieth-Century Retail Landscapes in the Midwest: A Case Study of Columbus, Ohio
  • Author(s): Paula Meijerink, Tameka Sims
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: The Constructed Environment
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of the Constructed Environment
  • Keywords: Climate Change, Green Infrastructure, Regeneration, Reuse
  • Volume: 9
  • Issue: 4
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2154-8587 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2154-8595 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2154-8587/CGP/v09i04/53-67
  • Citation: Meijerink, Paula, and Tameka Sims. 2018. "The Forest as a Future Ecology for Twentieth-Century Retail Landscapes in the Midwest: A Case Study of Columbus, Ohio." The International Journal of the Constructed Environment 9 (4): 53-67. doi:10.18848/2154-8587/CGP/v09i04/53-67.
  • Extent: 15 pages

Abstract

This article examines the ecological and spatial consequences of large-scale retail centers in the Midwest, specifically Columbus, Ohio, affected by the phenomena of changing urban trends and consumer behavior. The landscape of retail industry is changing as we know it. Consumer behavior has shifted to online and experiential shopping, leaving retail’s big box asphalt landscapes as obsolete spaces in the urban fabric of many cities, most notably those in the Midwest. While the ecological and social impact of these spaces have been known for over ten years, very little advancement, change, and adaptation can be seen in the way cities plan for growth and regeneration; the car remains a driving force behind design of all urban forms. Using the Paris Agreement on climate change as a guide for urban transformation, this research seeks to develop strategies for forestation practices for regional and community retail centers, which will enrich environmental values, create social identity, and, in turn, increase the economic value of surrounding communities.