Eco-Dharma and Climate Change

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  • Title: Eco-Dharma and Climate Change: An Ecospective Rendition of Valmiki Ramayana and Hindu Eco-Praxis for Environmental Conservation and Sustainable Living
  • Author(s): Neethu M. S. , Bhuvaneswari R.
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Religion in Society
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society
  • Keywords: Eco-Theology, Eco-Praxis, Eco-Dharma, First Law of Ecology, Hindu Tradition, Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam, Sustainability
  • Volume: 15
  • Issue: 1
  • Date: June 21, 2024
  • ISSN: 2154-8633 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2154-8641 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2154-8633/CGP/v15i01/145-163
  • Citation: M. S., Neethu, and Bhuvaneswari R.. 2024. "Eco-Dharma and Climate Change: An Ecospective Rendition of Valmiki Ramayana and Hindu Eco-Praxis for Environmental Conservation and Sustainable Living." The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society 15 (1): 145-163. doi:10.18848/2154-8633/CGP/v15i01/145-163.
  • Extent: 19 pages

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Abstract

Climate change is widely seen as a prominent and significant concern in contemporary society, representing a pivotal juncture in our collective history. Growing evidence suggests that our approach to climate change is also influenced by our religious beliefs. However, the manner and extent to which religious institutions, practices, and beliefs around the globe interact with the concept of climate change remains a subject that requires further investigation. This study explores the notion of environmental conservation put forth in the epic text The Ramayana and the eco-dharmic principles of Hinduism in the context of climate change, emphasizing Hindu customs as unique ecological spiritualities deeply rooted in profound reverence and connection to the natural world. It argues for the equal inclusion of religious studies and theology in the realm of climate science, highlighting the need to re-envision early Hindu literary traditions through an eco-theological lens for global sustainability, drawing attention to the correlation between the Sanskrit term Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam and Barry Commoner’s First Law of Ecology.