Calligraphic Ideograms, Plastic Poems, Spatialism, and Self-Referentiality

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  • Title: Calligraphic Ideograms, Plastic Poems, Spatialism, and Self-Referentiality: The Evolution of Japanese Concrete and Visual Poetry
  • Author(s): Maria Tornatore-Loong
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: The Image
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of the Image
  • Keywords: Japanese Concrete Poetry, Japanese Plastic Poetry, Japanese Visual Poetry, Spatialism, Supranational Poetry, Brazilian Concrete Poetry
  • Volume: 14
  • Issue: 2
  • Date: May 15, 2023
  • ISSN: 2154-8560 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2154-8579 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2154-8560/CGP/v14i02/23-62
  • Citation: Tornatore-Loong, Maria . 2023. "Calligraphic Ideograms, Plastic Poems, Spatialism, and Self-Referentiality: The Evolution of Japanese Concrete and Visual Poetry." The International Journal of the Image 14 (2): 23-62. doi:10.18848/2154-8560/CGP/v14i02/23-62.
  • Extent: 40 pages

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Abstract

This article explores the evolution of Japanese concrete and visual poetry from the early 1920s until the 1970s. Even though Japanese poets were initially inspired by French Symbolism and the literary, phonetic, and visual tendencies of Dada and surrealism, their transcultural, multilingual, ideological, and theoretical exchanges with Western modernist literary figures like Ezra Pound and the pioneers of the international vanguard concrete poetry movement, including the Brazilian Noigandres group, Eugen Gomringer, Luís Carlos Vinholes, and the French poet Pierre Garnier, were equally influential in developing their poetic métiers. With their experimental and innovative concrete and visual poetry, Japanese poets like Kitasono Katué, Niikuni Seiichi, Fujitomi Yasuo, Kamimura Hirō, and Yoshizawa Shoji created works that incorporated poetry with the visual arts, revolutionizing the distinctions between “word” and “visual object,” and literary and aesthetic discourses.