A Cross-sectional Study on Mental Wellbeing in the Sport, Le ...

Work thumb

Views: 34

  • Title: A Cross-sectional Study on Mental Wellbeing in the Sport, Leisure, and Fitness Industry: : Are the Wellbeing Champions Well?
  • Author(s): Amit D. Mistry, Matteo Bernardotto, Robin Chatterjee, Henry Simkins, Michael Brannan, Justin Varney
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Health, Wellness & Society
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Health, Wellness, and Society
  • Keywords: Mental Wellbeing, Public Health, Work Stressors, Occupational Health, Mental Health
  • Volume: 9
  • Issue: 2
  • Year: 2019
  • ISSN: 2156-8960 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2156-9053 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2156-8960/CGP/v09i02/45-55
  • Citation: Mistry, Amit D., Matteo Bernardotto, Robin Chatterjee, Henry Simkins, Michael Brannan, and Justin Varney. 2019. "A Cross-sectional Study on Mental Wellbeing in the Sport, Leisure, and Fitness Industry: : Are the Wellbeing Champions Well?." The International Journal of Health, Wellness, and Society 9 (2): 45-55. doi:10.18848/2156-8960/CGP/v09i02/45-55.
  • Extent: 11 pages

Abstract

The aim of this study was to measure mental wellbeing in people working in the Sport, Leisure, and Fitness (SLF) industry in the United Kingdom, and identify the factors associated with poor mental wellbeing. Methods: This cross-sectional study used an online survey and validated questionnaire (Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale, WEMWBS) to measure an association between work-related stressors with mental wellbeing scores. Results: Among the 820 participants, the mean mental wellbeing score was 49.7, similar to the national average (49.9). Participants who went to work despite not feeling well enough or experienced discrimination had lower mental wellbeing scores (p=<0.001 respectively), as did those who experienced work-related stress, pressure from managers, or lack of support (p=<0.001 respectively). Furthermore, 30 percent of participants experienced harassment or bullying. Female participants were found to be more likely than males to come to work despite not feeling well enough (56% versus 45%, p=0.002) and to experience discrimination at work (13% versus 3%, p=<0.001). Conclusions: Poorer mental wellbeing scores were found in participants experiencing work-related stressors and lack of support, with females affected more with regard to discrimination. These findings should encourage strategies to better understand and address the causes of poor mental wellbeing among the SLF workforce.