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Ubiquitous Learning and Instructional Technologies

Learning Module

Abstract

With presentations by leading researchers into technology innovation at the University of Illinois, this learning module explores the future of learning in an environment of ubiquitous technology-mediated communication. Bill Cope pushes the boundaries of possibility with his five propositions about the future of learning. Cris Mayo explores the gendered aspects of technology and ways in which we can critically engage with technologies in education. Chad Lane explores the dynamics of technology-mediated learning in games and museums. Maya Israel introduces the challenges and opportunities of teaching computer science.

Keywords

e-Learning, Educational Technologies

1. Learning Anywhere, Anytime - Bill Cope

 
 

 

For the Participant

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Comment: In what ways does technology mediated learning change both learning in person and learning at a distance? Discuss other participants' comments by mentioning them @name.

Make an Upate: Find an example of a learning technology which genuine makes a difference to the dynamics of learning. Describe it, and analyze the ways in which it makes a difference.

For the Instructor

2. Technology as a Social Relation in Online Pedagogy - Cris Mayo

For the Participant

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Comment: Discuss one stand-out idea from Cris Mayo's presentation.

Make an Update: Raise an issue about technology and gender. Provide examples and discuss implications.

For the Instructor

3. Repositioning Assessment and Instruction - Bill Cope

For the Participant

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See also this article on the potentials of big data.

Comment: How might it be possible to overcome some of the limitations of legacy assessment systems?

Make an Update: Take one aspect of big data in education. How does it work? What are its effects?

For the Instructor

4. The Orchestration of Learning Activities - H Chad Lane

For the Participant

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Comment: What are the lessons educators can learn from games?

Make an Update: "Parse" an educational game or museum experience. How does it work to support the learning process.

For the Instructor

5. The Nature of Classroom Learning - Bill Cope

For the Participant

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Comment: In what ways can computer-mediated learning environments support more active learning?

Make an Update: Describe and analyze an example of social learning supported by ubiquitous learning devices.

For the Instructor

6. Computer Science for All - Maya Israel

For the Participant

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Comment: What are the challenges and opportunities associated with learning computer coding?

Make an Update: Describe and evaluate a program, platform or pedagogy for increasing the understanding of how computing works.

For the Instructor

7. Setting Goals and Measuring Outcomes in Ubiquitous Learning Environments - Bill Cope

For the Participant

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Comment: How does the "logic" of assessment influence the logic of education?

Make an Update: Describe and evaluate an innovative assessment approach or technology.

For the Instructor

Peer Reviewed Work 1: Educational Theory

For the Participant

Take one of the theories or theoretical concepts introduced in this course. Look ahead into the learning module to get a sense of upcoming ideas—don’t feel constrained to explore concepts introduced early in the course. Or explore a related theory or concept of your own choosing that is relevant to the course themes. Convey in your introduction how your topic aligns with the course themes. Outline the theory or define the concept referring to the theoretical and research literature and illustrate the significance of the theory using examples of this concept at work in pedagogical practice.

A theory work should be 2000 words or more in length. Ideally it should include media such as images, diagrams, tables, embedded videos (either uploaded into CGScholar, or embedded from other sites), web links and other digital media. Be sure to source all material that is quoted or otherwise used. Each work must have references “element” or section, including references to at least five scholarly articles or books, plus any other necessary or relevant references, including to websites and other media.

For doctoral students, this must be in the genre of a literature review. The learning module and the updates we will make when we send you a request to begin this project will provide resources on the genre of literature review. (See Peer Reviewed Work 1: Appendix for more details)

If you are new to CGScholar, visit Section 3 in the Getting Started in Scholar learning module to find out how the Creator app works.

Following is the knowledge proccesses rubric, against which others will review your work, and against which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft. You can view this rubric while you draft your work at Creator => Feedback => Reviews => Rubric. The rubric explores four main knowledge processes, the background and rationale for which is described in the papers at this page.

Knowledge Processes Rubric and Literature Review Checklist

 

For the Instructor

For new users of CGScholar, we recommend the Learning Module, Getting Started in CGScholar. We specifically recommend at this stage that the admin release the following updates as the project proceeds:

  • 3.1: Starting a Work in Creator
  • 3.2: Using the Creator Workspace
  • 3.3: Using the Structure Tool
  • 3.4: Submitting a Draft
  • 3.5: Offering Feedback
  • 3.6: Revising a Work for Publication

CGScholar Tutorials

Peer Reviewed Work 1 Appendix: Literature Review (Doctoral)

For the Participant

The following information is an Appendix to the Work 1 Project: Educational Theory for Doctoral Students.

 

About the Literature Review Genre

The literature review should not merely be descriptive—it should be analytical and critical. However, at the same time it should be a fair representation of the perspectives and voices of a range of people across the field. What are the main issues arising for this issue, theme or topic? The main challenges to be addressed? The questions being asked by the intellectual and practical leaders in relation to this issue?

Sources

  • Include at least 10 scholarly sources.
  • 5 of these sources must be new to you (not used in previous courses, admin updates, your or your peers' updates, etc.).
  • ​Structure and Process
  • Use the Scholar Structure feature to organize your work.

Structure and Process

One possible structure for the literature review might be as follows:

  1. Introduction: how this literature review ties into your experience and research Interests.
  2. The issue, topic or theme: why it is significant and what are the challenges being addressed, as reported by the literature? (You may also wish to structure your literature review around sub-themes, in which case, be sure you cover points 2-6 in each of your subthemes.)
  3. A synthesis of key concepts and theoretical frameworks, as reported by the literature: compare and contrast approaches.
  4. A synthesis of methodologies of research and application employed to address these issues, topics and themes; their strengths and weaknesses, as reported by the literature. (alternatively, these could be embedded into Section 3)
  5. A synthesis of main empirical findings and practical implications. (alternatively, these could be embedded into Section 3)
  6. Gaps in the literature; open questions and where further work is needed.
  7. Conclusion: where this issue is heading, the tasks ahead for people addressing this issue.
  8. References: list sources cited, Including any media.(and also cite all media as captions to the media itself).

The Textual Features of the Genre, Literature Review

The literature review is a delicate play between the voices of the field, and the way you bring them together in a synthesis and interpretation. It will map out an issue, theme or topic, fairly representing varied voices, analyzing their differences, and critically interpreting the nuances.

Some questions to address in the literature review:

​By addressing them, apart from question 1, we mean based on what the literature conveys.

  1. What motivates your concern for this issue?
  2. As a body of work, what practical questions does this literature set out to address?
  3. What is the empirical range addresed in this issue, theme or topic?
  4. Who are the most influential and most cited thinkers?
  5. What are the main theories, interpretative frameworks, or paradigms which order knowledge when addressing this issue, theme or topic?
  6. What kinds of research methodology are used?
  7. What range of practices does this field spawn? What are its most exciting and promising areas of innovation?

References

  • Boote, David N. and Penny Beile. 2005. "Scholars before Researchers: On the Centrality of the Dissertation Literature Review in Research Preparation." Educational Researcher 34(6):3–15.
  • Galvan, Jose L. 2006. Writing a Literature Review: A Guide for Students of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Glendale CA: Pyrczak Publishing.
  • Machi, Lawrence A. and Brenda T. McEvoy. 2016. The Literature Review. Thousand Oaks CA: Corwin.

Web Tips

Here are some resources addressing the textual dynamics of a literature review:

References: On Academic Writing

You may also wish to take a moment to reflect on academic writing in general. Much academic writing is (frankly!) poor writing. Here are some readings and source books:

  • Strunk, William and E.B. White. 1979. Elements of Style. New York NY: Longman. (A classic!)
  • Sword, Helen. 2012. Stylish Academic Writing. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.
  • The University of Chicago Press Editorial Staff. 2017. The Chicago Manual of Style. Chicago IL: University of Chicago Press. Online edition.
  • Coursera Academic Writing Course.

You cannot be too obsessive about style and textual consistency! Two requests:

Always proof everything you submit, including first drafts for peer review.
As a reviewer, always note typos and suggest textual revisions to peers using the annotations tool.

Peer Review Rubric and Annotation Codes

The review rubric is made up of two parts. First are the knowledge process domains, the second are specific to the iterature review.

Knowledge Processes Rubric and Literature Review Checklist

As you create your work, we strongly encourage you to review and align your work with the rubric and checklist.

As a reviewer, it is very important that you assist your authors by providing specific feedback on which work-specific checklist item(s) need attention. We also encourage you to self-reflect on your own work and how you address the following items before submitting your final work. Requirements that aren't addressed will cause the work to be returned by the instructor for additional revisions.

Ask any questions or share suggestions in the comments area.

For the Instructor

Peer Reviewed Work 2A: Case Study of an Educational Technology (EdM)

For the Participant

Write a case study of an innovative learning practice—a method, a resource or a technology, for instance. This could be a reflection practice you have already used, or a new or unfamiliar practice which you would like to explore. Analyze an educational practice, or an ensemble of practices, as applied in a clearly specified a learning context. Use theory concepts introduced in this course. We encourage you to use theory concepts defined by members of the group in their published Work 1, with references and links to the published works of the other course participants.

Word limit: at least 2000 words

Media: Include images, diagrams, infographics, tables, embedded videos, (either uploaded into CGScholar, or embedded from other sites), web links, PDFs, datasets or other digital media. Be sure to caption media sources and connect them explicitly with the text, with an introduction before and discussion afterwards.

References: Include a References “element” or section with at least five scholarly articles or books that you have used and referred to in the text, and all the added media, plus any other necessary or relevant references, including websites.

Rubric: The educational practice rubric is the same as for Work 1, against which others will review your work, and against which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft.

Following is the knowledge processes rubric, against which others will review your work, and against which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft. You can view this rubric while you draft your work at Creator => Feedback => Reviews => Rubric. The rubric explores four main knowledge processes, the background and rationale for which is described in the papers at this page

Knowledge Processes Rubric

 

For the Instructor

Peer Reviewed Work 2B: Design a Learning Module

For the Participant

Create a learning module in CGScholar which demonstrates how you would translate some of the ideas and principles of this course into practice. A learning module is a hybrid work which crosses the legacy educational practices of lesson plan, syllabus and textbook.

Unlike a lesson plan which is mainly written for a teacher’s design purposes, a learning module has both teacher and learner sides. On the left side of the screen you speak to learners in “classroom discourse,” however in the case of the learning module, in a dialogical mode, rather like social media. On the right side of the screen, you speak to other teachers in the professional discourse of the curriculum and pedagogy. Unlike a syllabus, a learning module contains content as well as an outline of coverage. And unlike a textbook which typically summarizes and transmit content that learners are to consume and remember, a learning module curates a variety of web content (links, embedded media etc.) and establishes a dialogue with and between learners which positions them as active seekers and producers of knowledge.

Learning Module Requirements
Your learning module should:
1. Have a Learning Objectives section that addresses the following:

  • How your learning module applies the ideas and principles of this course into practice.
  • Your experience with the content area and whether this is new material or material that is being transformed and a summary of what has been done to transform the material.*
  • Doctoral Students: Include scholarly references to justify the need for the approach you are taking.

2. Have an Intended Learning Outcomes section that addresses the following:

  • Your target learners, including assumptions about prior learning
  • Curriculum standards, if applicable
  • Clear rationale in terms of learning objectives, expressed both to the learner (member side) and teacher (admin side)
  • Anticipated duration to complete the module, and material requirements

3. Include at least 6 updates, each of which on the left side includes at least some curated media and a comment request that will prompt rich dialogue among students, and on the right side speaks to teachers about the underlying pedagogical rationale, possible supplementary resources, teaching suggestions, and standards mapping.

4. Include at least one peer reviewed project, with peer assessment rubric.

5. Include at least one information or knowledge survey or assessment.

6. Demonstrate pedagogical coherence and completeness. Optionally, learning module creators could use the Learning by Design pedagogy, described here.

7. Be well-formatted in terms of the learning module two column format and heading structure.

8. Include citations for all media and other curated content throughout the work (below each image and video).

9. Include a references section of all sources and media used throughout the work.

10. Include a Work Icon (About this Work – Info – Work Icon).

Examples

For model K-12 learning modules, visit the Literacies and Learning by Design collections in the Scholar Bookstore. For model college and higher education learning modules, visit the Higher Education collection. For a selection of learning modules created by participants in the Learning Design and Leadership program, visit that collection. For instructions on how to create a Learning Module in Scholar, visit section 5 of the Getting Started in CGScholar learning module.

Review Rubric

In addition to the checklist items above, following is the peer review rubric for the learning module, against which others will review your work, and against which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft. You can view this rubric while you draft your work at Creator => Feedback => Reviews => Rubric. The rubric explores four main knowledge processes, the background and rationale for which is described in the papers at this page. If you want to use the L-by-D icons to mark activity types explicitly, you can copy and paste web icons located at this link.

LearningModuleRubric.pdf

 

For the Instructor

For new CGScholar who have not previously created a learning module we posting the following updates from Getting Started in CGScholar:

  • 5.1: Finding and Using Learning Modules
  • 5.2: Creating a Learning Module
  • 5.3: Designing a Survey
  • 5.4: Adding a Project and a Survey to a Learning Module

Peer Reviewed Work 2C: Evaluate a Learning Module

For the Participant

Work 2C: Evaluate Implementation of a Learning Module

Create an evaluation plan and evaluate a learning module as an educational intervention. This might be a learning module you have created in an earlier course in the program. For evaluation suggestions, visit section 6 of the Getting Started in Scholar learning module. Revise the learning module in light of the evaluation results, and discuss these revisions. Be sure to link to the revised learning module in your evaluation study. (Request republication of the revised version before linking.)

Rubric: The review rubric will be the same as for Work 1.

This plan should address the following elements:

  1. Background and Context, including citing the literature
  2. Problem/Needs Statement
  3. Evaluation Purpose and Audience
  4. Evaluation Goals and Objectives
  5. Evaluation Questions
  6. Evaluation Criteria
  7. Evaluation Design
  8. Data Collection Plan and how the data collection will answer the evaluation questions
  9. Evaluation Personnel and Roles
  10. Timeline
  11. Dissemination Plan
  12. References

Evaluation Findings

Share your evaluation findings while addressing the following:

  1. How do you want them to present their findings?? Do you have a sample of what you are looking for?
  2. Copies of data collection instruments used

 

For the Instructor

Annotated Bibliography Entry Tips (Doctoral)

For the Participant

Create annotated bibliography entries as a part of your five individiual updates.  They can be used within your projects.

The purpose of an annotated bibliography is to demonstrate that you can select the key publications of scholars who have also addressed a particular topic, as peer reviewed articles or books. Your commentary will demonstrate that you can make astute synthesis and analysis of each publication, and connect publications in a way that is indicative of your understanding of the topic addressed in these publications.

Finding and Selecting References

  • On the web. Be sure to supplement a general web search with Google Scholar. Not only does this narrow your search to scholarly articles and books. It has useful information about how widely a work and an author has been cited. However, be careful with this information—quantity does not necessarily mean quality or relevance to your interests. Less cited works may be very good or highly relevant.
  • In the library. Search for journal articles and e-books that are behind paywalls on the web.
  • Read review articles. Look for review articles that address your topic.
  • Follow the gossip! When you find an article or book that you really like, or that you find very helpful, look for who this author is citing. If their work is helpful, they will probably have a good eye for things that you will also find helpful. Look out particulary for citations that may be obscure and not necessarily popular in the sense of garnering a large number of citations. Think of academic writing as a kind of gossip network. Who is talking about whom?

Web Tips

  • Annotated Bibliographies
  • How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography
  • Annotated Bibliography Samples
  • Sample Annotated Bibliography
  • How to Write an Annotated Bibliography

Requirements and Considerations

  • Cite each reference formally and in full.
  • one or two paragraphs for each reference, summarizing its content and explaining its significance to the field and to the issues you will be addressing in your dissertation.

If you have created an annotated bibliography in other courses in this program, do not include any references from there. Do not use references included in the course materials or in your or your peers' weekly updates. These should all be new references.

Use the following structure:

Update Entry: Respond to the admin update prompt while referencing at least one scholarly article, then follow it with an Annotated Bibliography entry
Citation: Cite each reference formally and in full
Search Terms Used or Author Key Words
Source: If you can, include a PDF of the article or a book, or a link to its source.
Summary: For each reference, summarize its content and questions. Use the following format as a guide: a) Key Concepts (The concepts and theory used by the scholar(s) who authored the book or article.) b)Theory or Theories Methodology and Research Design and how this has been usefully insightful in the study c) Findings d) Significance The significance of the work in terms of its impact on the academic field, and the frequency with which it is cited (e.g. in Google Scholar - though of course, some works you may want to argue are important in their implications for the whole field, even if not widely known or cited.) This may also include practical applications and real-world consequences, actual or potential and creative and innovative extensions.

References: including all sources and any media used

For the Instructor