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Work 2B: Learning Module Design

Project Overview

Icon for Identity Exploration Learning Module

Identity Exploration Learning Module

Overview

In transformative learning, students use their own experience to craft their learning. In this learning module, students will reflect on their own experiences through various aspects of their identities. They will also build on their own experiences by learning about and making connections to the identities of their classmates and sources within the learning module. Therefore, the module applies transformative pedagogy to the classroom.

This is content I currently teach. I teach 9th grade English, and our whole year stems off of learning about identity with the core units of family, race, (dis)ability, gender, and intersectionality. Through this module, I'm taking the content I already teach and transforming it into an online, interactive, collaborative activity. 

Tett (2019), investigates the power of learning about identity through transformative learning:

"The individual should feel empowered to act on their transformed perspective, both in an individual and collaborative context, as opposed to uncritically accepting the assumptions of others (Mezirow, 1997). This process is regarded as emancipatory on an individual level as the individual will decide to act (or not) on the revised thinking which “ ... may result in immediate action, delayed action caused by situational constraints or lack of information on how to act, or result in a reasoned affirmation of an existing pattern of action” (Mezirow, 1996, p. 64). Action in this sense is focused on individual thought developed through the promotion of critical reflection, which questions “the integrity of deeply held assumptions and beliefs based on prior experience” (Taylor, 2009, p. 7)" (p. 155).

Tett expresses that transformative learning comes from the self and through collaboration, and that it's essential because identity is so complex and is built from so many different perspectives:

"The relationship between transformative learning and the concept of a learning identity is important because meaning perspectives, frames of reference, and habits of mind are substantial parts of identity. However, as Illeris (2014) argues, identity is more than this because “it spans all the dimensions of learning and mental processes: the cognitive, the emotional, and the social as well as the environmental and societal situatedness of this totality” (p. 160)" (p. 156).

In this module, the concept of identity will be analyzed through the self and through collaboration. It will enable student to critically reflect on their experiences and learn about others' experiences.

Transforming Leaning Identities in Literacy Programmes

References:

Tett, L. (2019). Transforming Learning Identities in Literacy Programmes. Journal of Transformative Education, 17(2), 154–172. doi: 10.1177/1541344617750277

Intended Learning Outcomes

For the Students

Intended Learning Outcomes: Through participating in this learning module, you will be able to:

  • Reflect on various aspects of what makes you who you are (your identity) in written form. Combine all writing pieces together for the final assessment.
  • Collaborate with peers about their identities, responding with empathy and understanding. Collaborate via peer review for the final assessmen

Rationale for Learning Outcomes: The reason we study identity is to understand ourselves and the different parts of what makes us who we are. Additionally, through understanding the complexity of identity, we develop empathy for others. If we carry ourselves with empathy at all times, we can create a positive environment in school and in the community

For the Teacher

Intended Learning Outcomes: Through participating in this learning module, students will be able to:

  • Reflect on various aspects of what makes you who you are (your identity) in written form. Combine all writing pieces together for the final assessment.
  • Collaborate with peers about their identities, responding with empathy and understanding. Collaborate via peer review for the final assessment.

Target Learners: Students in Freshman English (academic level)

Curriculum Standards (Standards Based Grading):
Standard 1. Comprehend text literally and inferentially
Standard 2. Guide writing with a central idea
Standard 3. Support ideas with details and elaboration
Standard 4. Participate in the writing process
Standard 5. Speak, discuss, and listen
Standard 6. Demonstrate vocabulary acquisition
Standard 7. Complete formative assessments

Rationale for Learning Outcomes: The reason students study identity is to help them understand themselves and the different parts of what makes them who they are. Additionally, through understanding the complexity of identity, they can develop empathy for others. By learning about identity using both personal reflection and complex texts, students can gain an understanding of themselves in the context of their community and the world.

Anticipated Duration: 1 year. Each update will be assessed formatively (standard 7) at the beginning of each unit. The final assessment will be a culmination of their writing from each update, and will be graded summatively under standards 2, 3, and 5

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What is Identity?

Update #1: Intro to Identity

What is identity? Who are we? This may seem like a simple question, but it's one that can't be answered without some reflection. As we journey through this learning module, we will explore this idea together and eventually form an answer to this layered question.

First, take this survey so I can learn what you already know about identity. I will use this information to plan future activities and engage with all of you throughout the module.

Next, watch this video to learn more about the concept of identity:

Media embedded September 27, 2019

Munther, R. (2015, November 5). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q84PtXfpANI.

Identity is made up of many parts of us, some of which may stay the same and some of which may change over time. You can be many different things all at once. That's what makes us complex and interesting people!

Hain, J. (2015). Retrieved from http://mhs.group.shef.ac.uk/portfolio/language-identity/

You may not know everything about your identity right now, and that's okay! Identity is something to continuously explore and even question. We will use this module to learn about our identities and write about them in various contexts. 

Sands, M. (2018). Retrieved from https://martechtoday.com/identity-is-having-its-moment-but-most-martech-isnt-ready-214846

The following link will bring you to a playlist of TedTalks about the question "Who are you?" Please choose one and watch it. As you watch, write down quotes that stand out to you.

Add a comment: Pretend you are Alice from Alice in Wonderland, and your teacher is the caterpillar. Answer the caterpillar's question, "Who are you?" in at least 200 words. Within your response, include a quote from the TedTalk you watched that helped you form your answer.

Respond to 3 other students' responses in at least 50 words each. In your peer responses, indicate the part of their response that stood out the most to you and why.

References:

Munther, R. (2015, November 5). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q84PtXfpANI.

Ted Ed. (n.d.). 8 TED Talks on what makes you, you. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/playlists/354/who_are_you.

Teacher Tools: Intro to Identity

Standards Assessed:

  • Standard 7
  • Working toward standards 2 and 3 from learning the content and writing the comment.
  • Working toward standard 5 by commenting on each others' responses.

From participating in this update, students will be able to...

  • Define the concept of identity and begin to piece together what makes them who they are.
  • Support their response about who they are with evidence from a TedTalk.

Rationale:

  • Having a strong foundation for what identity is will set students up for success with the rest of the module. 
  • Students will watch the same video first, but will have choice right after by being able to choose a TedTalk to watch and use as evidence in their response. 
  • Students will write a response that will be used in their final mini portfolio assessment. 

Suggestions:

  • Preface the first video with background about Alice in Wonderland so students understand the reference fully.
  • Show students a small section (20-30 seconds) of each of the TedTalks they can pick from so they make an informed choice. 

Ted. (n.d.). 8 TED Talks on what makes you, you. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/playlists/354/who_are_you.

  • Remind students that in their responses they should be open, but that other students will be reading their work and responding. Make that very clear so they don't become uncomfortable when their peers read their work.
  • Remind students to demonstrate kindness and empathy when they repsond to each other. They shouldn't say anything that they wouldn't want someone saying to them.

References:

Ted. (n.d.). 8 TED Talks on what makes you, you. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/playlists/354/who_are_you.

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Family and Identity

Update #2: Family and Identity

Family: Are all families the same? Do all families have the same impact on each other? How do our families make us who we are?

Watch the following TedTalk in which CJ Meadows talks about the "fusion family." Think about how differences in families shape family members into who they are.

Media embedded September 28, 2019

Meadows, C. J. (2015, July 13). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7PGMtOa-CA.

Next, read this essay from The New York Times, "What's a 'Normal' Family, Anyway?" 

Think about how people like CJ Meadows and Claire Huag have been shaped by their unique family experiences.

Read the third section of this article from The New York Times, "What Students Are Saying About 'How Do You Define Family?'"

Identify the definition that resonates with you the most. (The one that makes you think the most about your own definition of family). Keep it in mind for the comment you will be writing.

Write a comment: What is YOUR definition of family? What does family mean to you? Compare it to one of the definitions from "What Students Are Saying About 'How Do You Define Family?'" Cite that definition and explain how it relates to your definition of family. Include how your family impacts who you are. (200 words).

Comment on 3 peers' responses: How are your peers' definitions similar or different to your own? Compare/ contrast your definition to the definitions of 3 peers in 50 words each. 

References:

Huag, C. (2019, February 5). What's a "Normal" Family, Anyway? The New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com

Meadows, C. J. (2015, July 13). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7PGMtOa-CA.

What Students Are Saying About: The American Dream, Mindfulness in Schools and How to Define "Family.". (2019, February 14). The New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com

Teacher Tools: Family and Identity

Standards Assessed:

Standard 7
Working toward standards 2 and 3 from learning the content and writing the comment.
Working toward standard 5 by commenting on each others' responses.

From participating in this update, students will be able to...

  • Learn from three different sources about unique families.
  • Identify what the concept of family means to them personally.
  • Write reflectively about how family has impacted their identities and compare/ contrast their experiences with others' experiences.

Rationale:

  • Family is a big part of who we are, especially when we are young. It is helpful for young people to understand that where they started is a part of who they are, regardless of how that start impacted them. 
  • Written work in the comment will be revisited for the final assessment.
  • Writing in response to their peers will help them prepare for the collaborative portion of their assessement.

Suggestions:

  • Let students know that there is no "right" definition of family, that it's different for everyone.
  • Tell students that it is essential to keep an open mind as they learn about different types of families that may be different from their own.
  • Remind students that in their responses they should be open, but that other students will be reading their work and responding. Make that very clear so they don't become uncomfortable when their peers read their work.
  • Remind students to demonstrate kindness and empathy when they repsond to each other. They shouldn't say anything that they wouldn't want someone saying to them.
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Race and Identity

Update #3: Race and Identity

Race: What does it mean? How is it different from ethnicity and nationality? How does it make us who we are?

Watch the following video about the terms race, ethnicity, and nationality. What separates each term from the others? How do we define the word "race?"

Media embedded September 27, 2019

Pipes, E. (2016, February 23). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqV3CK6QfcU.

Follow this link to read the article "Multiracial Teens Talk About Their Identity Rip Tides" from Women's E News. Think about how the teens in the article faced social pressures that made it difficult to embrace their identities. What enabled them to explore and accept their identities?

Next, watch this TedTalk by Mellody Hobson, "Color Blind or Color Brave?" Think about the difference between color blind and color brave. How can we be color brave? (Action steps!)

Media embedded September 29, 2019

Hobson, M. (2014, May 5). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKtALHe3Y9Q.

Add a comment: How does your race and/ or ethnicity impact your identity? How does race impact Mellody Hobson's identity? How can we be color brave so social pressures lessen among teens? (200 words)

Respond to 3 peers: Respond to peers who have action steps toward being color brave as a community that stand out to you. What made them stand out to you? What else can you add to their ideas? 

References:

Geier, S., Verma, A., & Downing, H. (2016, February 2). Multiracial Teens Talk About Their Identity Rip Tides. Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://womensenews.org/2015/10/multiracial-teens-talk-about-their-identity-rip-tides/.

Hobson, M. (2014, May 5). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKtALHe3Y9Q.

Pipes, E. (2016, February 23). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqV3CK6QfcU.

Teacher Tools: Race and Identity

Standards Assessed:

Standard 7
Working toward standards 2 and 3 from learning the content and writing the comment.
Working toward standard 5 by commenting on each others' responses.

From participating in this update, students will be able to:

  • Learn from three different sources about race, ethnicity, nationality, and identity.
  • Identify what the concepts of race and ethnicity means to them personally.

Write reflectively about how race has impacted their identities and identify action steps toward being color brave as a community.

Rationale:

  • Race and ethnicity are terms that are often mistaken for each other. By learning the difference and exploring the idea of race, including the stereotypes and social pressures that teens face because of race and racism, students can develop an understanding of race and society.
  • Written work in the comment will be revisited for the final assessment.
  • Writing in response to their peers will help them prepare for the collaborative portion of their assessement.

Suggestions:

  • Preface this part of the module with the importance of acceptance, as it may be a new topic to some students. Remind students that the experiences they'll be learning are REAL lived experiences, so it is important to be sensitive.

Geier, S., Verma, A., & Downing, H. (2016, February 2). Multiracial Teens Talk About Their Identity Rip Tides. Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://womensenews.org/2015/10/multiracial-teens-talk-about-their-identity-rip-tides/.

  • Tell students that it is essential to keep an open mind as they learn about different perspectives about race.
  • Remind students that in their responses they should be open, but that other students will be reading their work and responding. Make that very clear so they don't become uncomfortable when their peers read their work.
  • Remind students to demonstrate kindness and empathy when they repsond to each other. They shouldn't say anything that they wouldn't want someone saying to them.

References:

Geier, S., Verma, A., & Downing, H. (2016, February 2). Multiracial Teens Talk About Their Identity Rip Tides. Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://womensenews.org/2015/10/multiracial-teens-talk-about-their-identity-rip-tides/.

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(Dis)ability and Identity

Update #4: (Dis)ability and Identity

Disability: What does it mean? Are all disabilities the same? How can we shift our culture toward celebrating disabilities?

Watch this video about what people with disabilities want you to know. Think about how you can approach the idea of "disability" in your lives.

Media embedded September 29, 2019

BuzzFeed Video. (2018, May 30). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b7k6pEnyQ4.

Next, watch this video about things you should do and things you should not do according to Michelle Middleton, who has cerebral palsy. As you watch, think about how you do and do not like to be treated, and how it compares to Michelle.

Media embedded September 29, 2019

Middleton, M. (2016, January 8). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVFjS_BdZiI.

Read this article from the American Psychological Association about some major themes of disability identity. Think about how these ideas relate to the videos.

Add a comment: In 200 words:

  • Explain how people with disabilities like to be treated, and connect those ideas to how you like to be treated. (Use at least one quote from one of the videos, and one quote from the article.)
  • Additionally, how can we use what we know about disabilities to celebrate disability?
  • What is something you wished people celebrated about you? (If you personally have a disability, feel free to include your experience in your response, although you do not have to.)

Respond to peers: In 50 words each, respond to 3 peers who you found connections with. Explain the connections between your response and their response. 

References:

BuzzFeed Video. (2018, May 30). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b7k6pEnyQ4.

Dunn, D. S., & Burcaw, S. (2013, November). Thinking About Disability Identity. Retrieved September 29, 2019, from http://www.apa.org/pi/disability/resources/publications/newsletter/2013/11/disability-identity.

Middleton, M. (2016, January 8). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVFjS_BdZiI.

Teacher Tools: (Dis)Ability and Identity

Standards Assessed:

Standard 7
Working toward standards 2 and 3 from learning the content and writing the comment.
Working toward standard 5 by commenting on each others' responses.

From participating in this update, students will be able to:

  • Learn from three different sources about disability and how people with disabilities want to be treated.
  • Identify how the way people with disabilities want to be treated is similar to the way they want to be treated.
  • Write reflectively about how to treat people with disabilities and how they personally want to be treated.

Rationale:

  • Disability is often misconstrued because people equate disability with a lack of ability. Learning about people with disabilities will help students understand that they don't want to be treated differently than anyone else, and that they would rather their disabilities be celebrated.
  • Written work in the comment will be revisited for the final assessment.
  • Writing in response to their peers will help them prepare for the collaborative portion of their assessement.

Suggestions:

  • Preface this part of the module with the importance of acceptance, as it may be a new topic to some students. Remind students that the experiences they'll be learning are REAL lived experiences, so it is important to be sensitive.
  • Tell students that it is essential to keep an open mind as they learn about the concept of disability.
  • Remind students that in their responses they should be open, but that other students will be reading their work and responding. Make that very clear so they don't become uncomfortable when their peers read their work.
  • Remind students to demonstrate kindness and empathy when they repsond to each other. They shouldn't say anything that they wouldn't want someone saying to them.
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Gender and Identity

Update #5: Gender and Identity

Gender: Is it what we think it is? Is it the same as biological sex? Does gender impact who we are?

First, let's unpack stereotypes involved in gender using 2 terms: masculinity and femininity. Watch this video to learn about the impact of gender stereotypes:

Media embedded September 29, 2019

FunSimpleLIFE. (2017, July 6). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=383aRjfNljk.

Now, let's talk about how gender can extend beyond boys and girls, or men and women. Watch this video with information about gender. Ask yourself if the way gender is defined is the same or different from what you though originally.

Media embedded September 29, 2019

AMAZE Org. (2019, June 20). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i83VQIaDlQw.

One of the terms we now know is "gender nonconforming" or "nonbinary." Read this Buzzfeed article about Jonathan Van Ness from "Queer Eye" and his experience with his gender identity. Think about how he came to understand his gender identity.

Add a comment: How have gender stereotypes affected you? In other words, what do people expect of you because of your gender? How have those stereotypes shaped your life? Additionally, what have you learned about gender that you didn't know before, and how will you use that knowledge going forward? (200 words)

Respond to peers: Find 3 peers whose responses stand out to you, or peers who have had similar experiences as you. Comment on what you found interesting about their responses.

References:

AMAZE Org. (2019, June 20). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i83VQIaDlQw.

FunSimpleLIFE. (2017, July 6). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=383aRjfNljk.

Yandoli, K. L. (2019, June 10). Jonathan Van Ness From Netflix's "Queer Eye" Said He Is Nonbinary. Retrieved September 29, 2019, from http://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/krystieyandoli/jonathan-van-ness-nonbinary-gender-nonconforming.

Teacher Tools: Gender and Identity

Standards Assessed:

Standard 7
Working toward standards 2 and 3 from learning the content and writing the comment.
Working toward standard 5 by commenting on each others' responses.

From participating in this update, students will be able to:

  • Learn from three different sources about gender, gender stereotypes, and how the concept of gender has evolved. 
  • Identify how their gender has impacted their identities and the identities of others.
  • Write reflectively about how gender has impacted their lives and who they are.

Rationale:

  • Gender is a concept that has evolved greatly over time, particularly in recent years. It is important to study gender in terms of the social expectations that have existed for boys and girls, and the new ideas about gender that have surfaced. The sources in this update cover both important concepts.
  • Written work in the comment will be revisited for the final assessment.
  • Writing in response to their peers will help them prepare for the collaborative portion of their assessement.

Suggestions:

  • Go over the definitions of biological sex, gender, and gender nonconforming with students before or as they complete the module. It can be a difficult concept for students to understand.
  • Preface this part of the module with the importance of acceptance, as it may be a new topic to some students. Remind students that the experiences they'll be learning are REAL lived experiences, so it is important to be sensitive.
  • Tell students that it is essential to keep an open mind as they learn about the concept of gender.
  • Remind students that in their responses they should be open, but that other students will be reading their work and responding. Make that very clear so they don't become uncomfortable when their peers read their work.
  • Remind students to demonstrate kindness and empathy when they repsond to each other. They shouldn't say anything that they wouldn't want someone saying to them.
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Intersectionality and Identity

Update #6: Intro to Intersectionality

Now, we will be tying everything together with intersectionality.

What is intersectionality? What does it have to do with everything we've learned so far?

Watch this video to learn about what intersectionality means:

Media embedded September 29, 2019

Teaching Tolerance. (2016, May 18). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6dnj2IyYjE.

Now, watch this video about intersectional feminism (explained through pizza!)

Media embedded September 29, 2019

Akilah Obviously. (2015, April 8). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgK3NFvGp58.

Next read this article from Teen Vogue by seventeen-year-old Eva Lewis about her experience with advocacy and intersectionality. 

Write a comment: What are the most important intersections of YOUR identity? Explain why they are the most important, and how they intersect. Additionally, are there any aspects of your identity that you feel are not represented by our units? Friends? Personality? Age? How do these factors intersect with other parts of your identity?Explain! (200 words).

Comment on your peers: Find 3 peers whose intersections stand out to you. Explain why they stood out to you in 50 words each.

References:

Akilah Obviously. (2015, April 8). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgK3NFvGp58.

Lewis, E. (2017, May 26). The Conflicting Difficulties of Being a Black Feminist In America. Retrieved September 29, 2019, from http://www.teenvogue.com/story/why-i-am-passionate-about-intersectionality-eva-lewis.

Teaching Tolerance. (2016, May 18). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6dnj2IyYjE.

Teacher Tools: Intersectionality

Standards Assessed:

Standard 7
Working toward standards 2 and 3 from learning the content and writing the comment.
Working toward standard 5 by commenting on each others' responses.

From participating in this update, students will be able to:

  • Learn from 3 difference sources about what intersectionality means as a term and to the individual.
  • Identify the intersections of their own identities and how they have been impacted by them.
  • Write reflectively about how intersections of their identities hace impacted their lives and who they are.

Rationale:

  • Intersectionality is the capstone concept in learning about identity. Through learning about intersectionality, students can learn about just how complex identity really is. It ties everything from throughout the module together in a concrete term.
  • Written work in the comment will be revisited for the final assessment.
  • Writing in response to their peers will help them prepare for the collaborative portion of their assessement.

Suggestions:

  • Review terms from throughout the unit and the term intersectionality for students.
  • Have examples of intersectionality on hand, as students may have trouble identifying where their identities intersect
  • Tell students that it is essential to keep an open mind as they learn about the concept of intersectionality.
  • Remind students that in their responses they should be open, but that other students will be reading their work and responding. Make that very clear so they don't become uncomfortable when their peers read their work.
  • Remind students to demonstrate kindness and empathy when they repsond to each other. They shouldn't say anything that they wouldn't want someone saying to them.
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Assessment

Final Assessment

Your final assessment is a culmination of all the comments you've written throughout this module and a written reflection. Please see the attached PDF's for the assessment description and the rubric you will be scored on.

Identity Exploration Final Assessment
Identity Exploration Rubric

Additionally, you are responsible for completing a peer review for 3 other students. This will be completed in Scholar. Please see the attached PDF's for the peer review requirements and rubric.

Peer Review Description
Peer Review Rubric

 

Assessment Criteria

Students will be graded on their written work and their peer reviews. The standards that will be assessed are as follows:

For the written work...

Standard 2 (Writing with a guiding theme)

Standard 3 (Writing with details and elaboration)

For the peer reviews...

Standard 5 (Speak, discuss, and listen)

Attached below are the assessment description, the written assessment rubric, the peer review description, and the peer review rubric. When scoring students, focus on the development of their writing and identify areas of improvement where development is lacking. Each piece should be a complete, albeit short, piece of writing. The reflection should be the most developed section.

Identity Exploration Final Assessment
Identity Exploration Written Work Rubric
Identity Exploration Peer Review Description
Identity Exploration Peer Review Rubric

Enjoy learning about your students! It is fun to learn about them through this written work.

 

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References

 

Akilah Obviously. (2015, April 8). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgK3NFvGp58.

BuzzFeed Video. (2018, May 30). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b7k6pEnyQ4.

Dunn, D. S., & Burcaw, S. (2013, November). Thinking About Disability Identity. Retrieved September 29, 2019, from http://www.apa.org/pi/disability/resources/publications/newsletter/2013/11/disability-identity.

FunSimpleLIFE. (2017, July 6). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=383aRjfNljk.

Geier, S., Verma, A., & Downing, H. (2016, February 2). Multiracial Teens Talk About Their Identity Rip Tides. Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://womensenews.org/2015/10/multiracial-teens-talk-about-their-identity-rip-tides/.

Hain, J. (2015). Retrieved from http://mhs.group.shef.ac.uk/portfolio/language-identity/

Hobson, M. (2014, May 5). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKtALHe3Y9Q.

Huag, C. (2019, February 5). What's a "Normal" Family, Anyway? The New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com

Meadows, C. J. (2015, July 13). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7PGMtOa-CA.

Middleton, M. (2016, January 8). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVFjS_BdZiI.

Munther, R. (2015, November 5). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q84PtXfpANI.

Lewis, E. (2017, May 26). The Conflicting Difficulties of Being a Black Feminist In America. Retrieved September 29, 2019, from http://www.teenvogue.com/story/why-i-am-passionate-about-intersectionality-eva-lewis.

Pipes, E. (2016, February 23). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqV3CK6QfcU.

Sands, M. (2018). Retrieved from https://martechtoday.com/identity-is-having-its-moment-but-most-martech-isnt-ready-214846

Teaching Tolerance. (2016, May 18). Retrieved September 29, 2019, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6dnj2IyYjE.

Ted. (n.d.). 8 TED Talks on what makes you, you. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/playlists/354/who_are_you.

Tett, L. (2019). Transforming Learning Identities in Literacy Programmes. Journal of Transformative Education, 17(2), 154–172. doi: 10.1177/1541344617750277

What Students Are Saying About: The American Dream, Mindfulness in Schools and How to Define "Family.". (2019, February 14). The New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com