Scholar

In the Lands of World Maker

By: Deserea Langley  

World Maker traveled throughout Northeastern California creating and naming the landscape for people. World Maker formed the world according to the resources found at each place designating places that were livable, places that should be cautionary and places that had resources for people to use. Native American responsibility to land is inherently tied to the transmission of knowledge which offer lessons and values that are shared through oral stories and religious ceremonies. Native American responsibility to land is inherently tied to the transmission of knowledge which guide the morality of people and communities, offering lessons and values that are shared through oral stories, religious ceremonies, and land management. Dispossession from traditional homelands serve as a primary factor to the fracture of Native American religious activities and responsibilities that tie Maidu, Paiute, Pit River and Washoe people to the Northeastern California landscape. My research focuses on the disruption of “Susanville Indians” knowledge systems under the Dawes Allotment Act of 1887. The act assisted in the surveying of Indian land to divide Indian communal land holdings into individual allotments. Exploitative economies and the outright selling of Indian land denied access to sacred sites and knowledge centers that are imperative to the identity, religious ceremonies, and land management of Susanville Indian tribal members. As a foundation, I use the Mountain Maidu creation story to shape the discussion on interaction by tribal members to revitalize religious practices, language and land management.

Native American, Oral History, Settler Colonialism, Land
The Politics of Religion
Paper Presentation in a Themed Session



Deserea Langley

Native American Studies , University of California, Davis, United States
United States