Scholar

A Pilot Study of Subjective Age and Health-related Factors in Healthy Japanese Older Adults from the Tenth Health Check-up

By: Megumu Yazawa (Yamamoto)   Naoko Sakuma   Hiroyuki Suzuki   Susumu Ogawa   Masashi Yasunaga   Ryota Sakurai   Tomoya Takahashi   Yoh Murayama   Yoshinori Fujiwara  

Several studies have examined factors related to “subjective age”, in particular, those that focus on subjective health, such as the SF36v2 and other health-related items. However, the questions about subjective age are not standardized, and the concepts of subjective age have not been revealed yet. This study investigated the relationship between subjective age and health-related QOL with two different questions. One hundred and seventy healthy older adults (mean age and SD, 76.9±4.7; mean MMSE score, 28.2) completed the tenth health check-up who underwent annual measurements from 2004. In the tenth health check-up, their subjective age was assessed based on two questions with a three-point scale (felt older, about same, felt younger): (1) the self-expected age: “What extent do you feel getting older compared to what you expected ten years ago?” (2) the comparative age: “How old do you feel older people around you are compared to you?” The results showed that the percentage of participants who felt younger than they expected was 41.1% (the self-expected age). The percentage of participants who felt younger than compared with around them was 45.1% (the comparative age). Logistic regression analyses with the self-expected age was significantly associated with General Health, which is a subscale of the SF36v2 (OR =1.05, 95% CI [1.03, 1.07]). The comparative age was significantly associated with Mental Health (OR=1.03, 95% CI [1.01, 1.06]), and Everyday Memory Checklist scores (OR=0.90, 95% CI [0.83, 0.99]). These findings suggest that self-expected age and comparative age are different components of subjective age.

Subjective age, Felt Age, Mental Health, QOL, Everyday Memory Checklist
Social and Cultural Perspectives on Aging
Poster Session



Megumu Yazawa (Yamamoto)

Ochanomizu University




Naoko Sakuma

Research Team for Promoting Independence and Mental Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan
Japan



Hiroyuki Suzuki

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan
Japan



Susumu Ogawa

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan
Japan



Masashi Yasunaga

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan
Japan



Ryota Sakurai

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan
Japan



Tomoya Takahashi

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan
Japan



Yoh Murayama

Research Team for Social Participation and Community Health, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan
Japan



Yoshinori Fujiwara

Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Japan
Japan