The Risks and Mental Health Benefits of Hot Yoga Participatio ...

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  • Title: The Risks and Mental Health Benefits of Hot Yoga Participation for Adults with Anxiety and/or Depression
  • Author(s): Casey Mace Firebaugh, Brandon Eggleston
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Health, Wellness & Society
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Health, Wellness, and Society
  • Keywords: Hot Yoga, Anxiety, Depression, Risks
  • Volume: 7
  • Issue: 4
  • Year: 2017
  • ISSN: 2156-8960 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2156-9053 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2156-8960/CGP/v07i04/1-7
  • Citation: Firebaugh, Casey Mace, and Brandon Eggleston. 2017. "The Risks and Mental Health Benefits of Hot Yoga Participation for Adults with Anxiety and/or Depression." The International Journal of Health, Wellness, and Society 7 (4): 1-7. doi:10.18848/2156-8960/CGP/v07i04/1-7.
  • Extent: 7 pages

Abstract

Background: There is little evidence examining the risks of hot yoga participation for individuals with depression or anxiety. Methods: A large cross-sectional study (n=700) was conducted using an online survey for hot yoga participants. Individuals who self-identified having anxiety and/or depression (n=317) made up a large proportion of the main sample. Individuals reported the experience of adverse outcomes as well as benefits as a result of hot yoga practice. Chi-squared and Pearson correlation scores were calculated between the presence of anxiety and/or depression and the experience of an adverse outcome or benefit related to mental health. Results: Those with depression and/or anxiety were more likely to experience decreased anxiety and depression, while those specifically with comorbid anxiety/depression were more likely to experience improved mood as a result of hot yoga participation. Those with depression and anxiety were more likely to experience some adverse outcomes that are related symptoms to those disorders as well as side-effects of medications for treatments common for those conditions as a result of hot yoga participation, such as dizziness, nausea, and feeling light-headed. Conclusion: Overall the risks of hot yoga participation do not appear to outweigh the benefits of participation. The symptoms of anxiety and depression and psychiatric medications need further examination in their interaction with hot yoga practice.