The Relationship between Stress Levels and Timely Graduation ...

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  • Title: The Relationship between Stress Levels and Timely Graduation of Community College Students
  • Author(s): Christine B. Kleinpeter, Marilyn K. Potts, Molly Ranney, Sharon Chen
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: The Learner
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Learning in Higher Education
  • Keywords: Community College Student Health, College Student Stress Levels, Timely Graduation
  • Volume: 25
  • Issue: 4
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2327-7955 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2327-8749 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2327-7955/CGP/v25i04/47-58
  • Citation: Kleinpeter, Christine B., Marilyn K. Potts, Molly Ranney, and Sharon Chen. 2018. "The Relationship between Stress Levels and Timely Graduation of Community College Students." The International Journal of Learning in Higher Education 25 (4): 47-58. doi:10.18848/2327-7955/CGP/v25i04/47-58.
  • Extent: 12 pages

Abstract

This exploratory study compares the College Student Stress Scale scores of thirty-five students who received mental health services, thirty-six students who received medical services, and a comparison group of forty-two students who were enrolled in a college 100 class. Females were in the majority in both the medical and mental health groups, men had a slight majority in the classroom sample. The average age was similar in all groups, between twenty-one and twenty-three years. The predominant ethnic groups were non-Hispanic white in the medical and mental health groups, and Asian in the classroom group. Results indicated that nearly three-fourths in each group reported a later than expected graduation. Student Stress Scale scores were in the moderate range in total. The individual item with the highest score was academic matters, followed by financial matters, and meeting personal goals. Students who were receiving mental health treatment had higher stress level scores than medical patients or the classroom sample. Females scored higher than males in overall stress level. Students with higher stress levels were more likely to report a delayed graduation. Work and financial issues were reported most often as reasons for delayed graduation. Educational implications are provided. Areas for future research are outlined.