The Effects of Preschool Teachers’ Perception of Problem Beha ...

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  • Title: The Effects of Preschool Teachers’ Perception of Problem Behaviors on Teacher Sense of Self-Efficacy
  • Author(s): Raquel Plotka
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: The Learner
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Early Childhood Learning
  • Keywords: Preschool Teachers, Self-efficacy, Problem Behaviors, Teacher-Child Interactions
  • Volume: 26
  • Issue: 1
  • Year: 2019
  • ISSN: 2327-7939 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2327-8722 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2327-7939/CGP/v26i01/1-13
  • Citation: Plotka, Raquel. 2019. "The Effects of Preschool Teachers’ Perception of Problem Behaviors on Teacher Sense of Self-Efficacy." The International Journal of Early Childhood Learning 26 (1): 1-13. doi:10.18848/2327-7939/CGP/v26i01/1-13.
  • Extent: 13 pages

Abstract

Teacher sense of self-efficacy to address conflict in preschool classrooms is central to children’s behavioral and academic outcomes. This study is aimed at exploring some of the classroom experiences that shape teacher levels of self-efficacy. The study proposed that teacher perception of problem behavior in children might result in negative teacher-child interactions, which would cause low levels of teacher sense of efficacy. Similarly, teacher perception of problem behavior in children might result in lower behavioral expectations, which would affect a teacher’s sense of self-efficacy. The participants were 328 teachers placed in two, three, and four year old classrooms serving children from low socioeconomic status in urban preschools. The data was analyzed using path analysis, and the results show that, controlling for children’s age, the perception of problem behaviors had a significant effect on teachers’ levels of self-efficacy. In addition, perception of problem behaviors predicted higher levels of negative teacher-child interactions, and negative teacher-child interactions resulted in lower levels of teachers’ sense of self-efficacy. Perceived problem behaviors did not predict teachers’ behavioral expectations, and teachers’ expectations did not predict teachers’ sense of self-efficacy. These results have implications for practice, teacher education, and further research.