Light’s Impact on Color, Materials, and People’s Preferences

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  • Title: Light’s Impact on Color, Materials, and People’s Preferences
  • Author(s): Rebekah Matheny, Emily L. Bell
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Design Principles & Practices
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Architectonic, Spatial, and Environmental Design
  • Keywords: Lighting Design, Interior Design, Millennials, Baby Boomers, Color Temperature of Light, LED
  • Volume: 12
  • Issue: 2
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2325-1662 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2325-1670 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2325-1662/CGP/v12i02/41-49
  • Citation: Matheny, Rebekah, and Emily L. Bell. 2018. "Light’s Impact on Color, Materials, and People’s Preferences ." The International Journal of Architectonic, Spatial, and Environmental Design 12 (2): 41-49. doi:10.18848/2325-1662/CGP/v12i02/41-49.
  • Extent: 9 pages

Abstract

Interior environments address a range of user needs, including those of Millennials and Baby Boomers. To develop lighting strategies, designers must go beyond standard lighting metrics, considering people’s perceptions of how light’s color temperature affects material appearance. With technological advances in lighting, the impact of LED light on sensorial perceptions of color, materials, and people’s emotions is more important than ever. Millennials grew up with a prevalence of cool-colored compact fluorescent or LED light. However, Baby Boomers have mostly lived with warm-colored incandescent light. Through research of these generations’ lighting preferences, designers can consider lighting for public environments in a new way. This survey-based research project, “Perceptions of Light and Color,” explores Millennial and Baby Boomer preferences of interior finish material palettes illuminated by different color temperatures of LED light. Understanding these generations’ preferences of lighting color temperature in healthcare, hospitality, restaurant, and corporate office environments, designers can ensure the emotional intention of the environment is experienced by the end users.