Improving Attitude toward Engagement in a Biology Course of M ...

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  • Title: Improving Attitude toward Engagement in a Biology Course of Mathematics and Computer Science Students through the Active Learning Integration Approach: A Case Study in a Thai Science High School
  • Author(s): Arjaree Thirach, Surakrai Nantaburom
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: The Learner
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Learning
  • Keywords: Active Learning, Classroom Action Research, Biology Teaching, Science High School, Pedagogy
  • Volume: 31
  • Issue: 2
  • Date: July 05, 2024
  • ISSN: 2327-7971 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2327-915X (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2327-7971/CGP/v31i02/119-135
  • Citation: Thirach, Arjaree, and Surakrai Nantaburom. 2024. "Improving Attitude toward Engagement in a Biology Course of Mathematics and Computer Science Students through the Active Learning Integration Approach: A Case Study in a Thai Science High School." The International Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Learning 31 (2): 119-135. doi:10.18848/2327-7971/CGP/v31i02/119-135.
  • Extent: 17 pages

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Abstract

Many students studying mathematics and computer science find the biology courses difficult, which may make them less interested in the subject. This study aimed to identify the attitudes of mathematics and computer science students toward a biology course, implementing the Active Learning Integration Approach (ALIA) in the biology course, and compares the attitudes of mathematics and computer science students toward the biology course before and after. The study included thirty-three mathematics and computer science students who participated and used a one-group pre-test–post-test design for the experiment. The ALIA method was applied to the genetics and evolution course. It included integrated lectures with questions that focused on student discussions, peer-led team learning, on-the-spot feedback without grading pressure, and gamification approaches. Survey results revealed that there was a statistically significant difference at the 0.05 level in the pre-and post-test scores for positive feelings about biology and more objective answers in biology. Students had high satisfaction with the course in terms of its importance, interest, usefulness, and challenge, but these did not change significantly after the post-test at the 0.05 level. Interviews conducted with the students unveiled factors such as a robust understanding of the subject matter, effective handling of exercises and exam questions, and consistent success in quizzes that were key motivators in cultivating a positive attitude toward biology. These aspects held greater significance than engaging in enjoyable activities without a strong foundational understanding of the subject matter.