The Confluence of Reinforcement, Exploratory, and Adversarial ...

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  • Title: The Confluence of Reinforcement, Exploratory, and Adversarial Learning in Religion and Science
  • Author(s): Siva Mangalam
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Common Ground Open
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society
  • Keywords: Body, Emotion, Jesus, Liberation, Mind, Nirvana, Precepts, Reason, Teachings, The Buddha, Yoga
  • Volume: 8
  • Issue: 4
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2154-8633 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2154-8641 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2154-8633/CGP/v08i04/29-43
  • Citation: Mangalam, Siva. 2018. "The Confluence of Reinforcement, Exploratory, and Adversarial Learning in Religion and Science." The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society 8 (4): 29-43. doi:10.18848/2154-8633/CGP/v08i04/29-43.
  • Extent: 15 pages

Abstract

This article presents a coherent three-phase approach consisting of Preparation, Exploration, and (Re)Search that is common to both religion and science. In general, science explores the objective world of matter, whereas religion focuses on the subjective world of the mind. In science, Preparation is devoted to learning the fundamentals and control conditions through copying, memorization, reinforcement, and practice with instructions from teachers. The domain of the known is explored thoroughly in the second phase with guidance from experts. The third phase is devoted to research into the unknown to resolve inconsistencies that were encountered during exploration. In religion, preparation begins with the practice of precepts that are viewed as prophylactic measures to prevent false perceptions of reality from taking root in the mind. Next, the body-mind-emotion coupling is explored to identify the source of mental disturbances (suffering), if present. The third phase is devoted to the search for truth or the eternal principle, also known as “dharma,” “logos,” or the “Tao” that governs the human mind. The teachings of the Buddha and Jesus are interpreted in a rational manner to elucidate how they guide a diligent seeker to the realization of “nirvana” or liberation.