Extracurricular Engagement and Person-Organization Fit throug ...

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  • Title: Extracurricular Engagement and Person-Organization Fit through Internalizing Organizational Mission Statements and Values
  • Author(s): Ryan Stephenson, Colt Rothlisberger, Jonathan H. Westover
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Organization Studies
  • Journal Title: Organizational Cultures: An International Journal
  • Keywords: Person-Organization Fit, Values Congruence, Organizational Mission, Organizational Values
  • Volume: 17
  • Issue: 4
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2327-8013 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2327-932X (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2327-8013/CGP/v17i04/21-37
  • Citation: Stephenson, Ryan , Colt Rothlisberger, and Jonathan H. Westover. 2018. "Extracurricular Engagement and Person-Organization Fit through Internalizing Organizational Mission Statements and Values." Organizational Cultures: An International Journal 17 (4): 21-37. doi:10.18848/2327-8013/CGP/v17i04/21-37.
  • Extent: 17 pages

Abstract

Although there is great reason to believe that extracurricular organizations are of great benefit to college students across the country, little research has been conducted that measures how well students align with the organization’s values and, in turn, if those values affect the student’s level of satisfaction and overall engagement within the organization. In our research, we analyzed a leadership program at an intermountain regional teaching university to find how the program’s mission statement influenced the student’s value alignment, engagement, and overall satisfaction during their participation in the program. We administered an online survey that used questions adapted from the Short Schwartz Values Survey and the Gallup Q 12 surveys. From the results of our research, we concluded that students who are satisfied, reflected on the mission statement, had opportunities to learn and grow, aligned with the organization in benevolence and power, were more likely to have a higher level of engagement.