Exploring Consumer Values of Thai Cultural Products through t ...

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  • Title: Exploring Consumer Values of Thai Cultural Products through the Means-end Approach and Schwartz’s Universal Human Values
  • Author(s): Anawat Tanyavutti, Pongpun Anuntavoranich, Krittinee Nuttavuthisit
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Design Principles & Practices
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Design in Society
  • Keywords: Cultural Products, Means-end Chain, Hierarchical Value Map, Schwartz’s Universal Human Values
  • Volume: 13
  • Issue: 3
  • Year: 2019
  • ISSN: 2325-1328 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2325-1360 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2325-1328/CGP/v13i03/1-15
  • Citation: Tanyavutti, Anawat, Pongpun Anuntavoranich, and Krittinee Nuttavuthisit. 2019. "Exploring Consumer Values of Thai Cultural Products through the Means-end Approach and Schwartz’s Universal Human Values." The International Journal of Design in Society 13 (3): 1-15. doi:10.18848/2325-1328/CGP/v13i03/1-15.
  • Extent: 15 pages

Abstract

This study aims at identifying attributes-consequences-values (ACV) linkage chains with regard to consumers purchasing Thai cultural products by adopting Olson’s Means-end Chain Theory and Schwartz’s universal human values theory. Thirty Thai consumers purchasing Thai cultural products were interviewed employing a laddering method. The research unveils key product attributes, including Made by Thai Rural People, Cultural Story, and Authentic Local Experience, as critical ingredients that Thai cultural products should feature. Benevolence, Hedonism, and Stimulation were the main values that drove consumers when purchasing Thai cultural products. Eight key ACV linkages were identified, and typology of consumer values was developed, including Thai Contemporary Design–Self-direction, Natural Material–Hedonism, Historical Association–Hedonism, Location-specific Material and Production–Hedonism, Authentic Local Experience–Tradition, Cultural Story–Stimulation, Cultural Story–Power, and Made by Thai Rural People–Benevolence. From the eight patterns, Thai-Contemporary Design–Self-Direction, Cultural Story–Stimulation, and Cultural Story–Power showed stronger linkages than the others and were considered the key typology of values of Thai cultural products. The research outcome should provide key insights for designing Thai cultural products that satisfy consumers’ tastes and preferences.