Expanding Linguistic, Cultural, and Literacies Toolkits

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  • Title: Expanding Linguistic, Cultural, and Literacies Toolkits: Engaging Diversity in Traditional and Virtual Learning Spaces
  • Author(s): Leanne Margaret Boschman, Meilan P. Ehlert
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: New Directions in the Humanities
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Communication and Linguistic Studies
  • Keywords: Multiliteracies, Plurilingualism, Multilingual Education, Learning Journal
  • Volume: 14
  • Issue: 2
  • Year: 2016
  • ISSN: 2327-7882 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2327-8617 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2327-7882/CGP/v14i02/35-47
  • Citation: Boschman, Leanne Margaret, and Meilan P. Ehlert. 2016. "Expanding Linguistic, Cultural, and Literacies Toolkits: Engaging Diversity in Traditional and Virtual Learning Spaces." The International Journal of Communication and Linguistic Studies 14 (2): 35-47. doi:10.18848/2327-7882/CGP/v14i02/35-47.
  • Extent: 13 pages

Abstract

The purpose of our paper is to call for a deeper understanding of the complexity and multiplicity in today’s dynamic educational contexts. We consider that diversity is an essential component of contemporary classrooms, particularly in terms of cultures, languages, and literacy practices. In particular, the authors are interested in the way that bilingual and plurilingual learners use language as a mobile resource moving through virtual worlds and how this mobility and flexibility may be applied to e-learning tools and a range of traditional pedagogical tools. The learning or reflective journal is considered, in particular, in terms of the ways that it could be framed by multiliteracies and critical literacies approaches, mother-tongue based multilingual education, and translingual practices. The researchers base this paper on ethnographic research that includes interviews, focus group discussions, surveys, and document analysis and find that the traditional classroom journal could become a digital domain in which learners’ sociocultural and linguistic repertoires could serve as a starting point for fostering a classroom culture of inclusion and that these repertoires might be drawn from forms of family and community-of-origin discourses, popular culture, digital domains, and other hybrid discourse landscapes through which learners travel.