Developing Studio Teaching Methodologies through Distance Lea ...

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  • Title: Developing Studio Teaching Methodologies through Distance Learning in Lighting Design
  • Author(s): Stelios Zerefos, Theodora Antonakaki
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Design Principles & Practices
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Design Education
  • Keywords: Lighting Design, Design Education, Architectural Education, Distance Learning, Virtual Design Studio
  • Volume: 13
  • Issue: 4
  • Year: 2019
  • ISSN: 2325-128X (Print)
  • ISSN: 2325-1298 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2325-128X/CGP/v13i04/51-68
  • Citation: Zerefos, Stelios , and Theodora Antonakaki. 2019. "Developing Studio Teaching Methodologies through Distance Learning in Lighting Design." The International Journal of Design Education 13 (4): 51-68. doi:10.18848/2325-128X/CGP/v13i04/51-68.
  • Extent: 18 pages

Abstract

This article discusses the implementation of studio teaching techniques throughout a distance learning graduate course in lighting design. Specifically, conventional distance learning techniques are adjusted so as to include a studio-type educational method for a multi-disciplinary audience, ranging from architects and photographers to electrical and computer engineers. The challenge to be met throughout the course is the integration of several aspects of blended distance learning, such as periodic meetings in a physical space, online tutorials and forums, direct email correspondence, and video conferencing sessions, into a single methodology that can supplement and eventually substitute the absence of a physical design studio. The formulation of individual and teamwork assignments is considered essential during the course and is targeted so that students from different disciplines can actually cooperate to accomplish a lighting design project. To this end, the coursework is designed in such a way so that it provides the necessary stimuli for each different discipline to complete the studio course in their own area of expertise and their corresponding tools. This benefits the whole class, since common practices from different professions become evident as a tool for analyzing, designing, or presenting a lighting project. Thus, the final cooperative design project can be considered as integrated and ready for implementation, while during the design process the students attain skills found in disciplines different than their own, broadening their educational and professional knowledge. Assessment evidence is shown through the statistical results of individual assignments, as well as the graphic representation of the teamwork lighting design projects.