Between Hajj and the Christian Pilgrimage

Work thumb

Views: 83

  • Title: Between Hajj and the Christian Pilgrimage: Parallels, Contrasts, and Implications for Nigeria
  • Author(s): Kahar Wahab Sarumi
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Religion in Society
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society
  • Keywords: Religion, Christianity, Islam, Pilgrimage, Hajj, Ka’aba, Makkah, Medina, Jerusalem, Rome, Nigeria
  • Volume: 8
  • Issue: 2
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2154-8633 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2154-8641 (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2154-8633/CGP/v08i02/1-11
  • Citation: Sarumi, Kahar Wahab. 2018. "Between Hajj and the Christian Pilgrimage: Parallels, Contrasts, and Implications for Nigeria." The International Journal of Religion and Spirituality in Society 8 (2): 1-11. doi:10.18848/2154-8633/CGP/v08i02/1-11.
  • Extent: 11 pages

Abstract

Pilgrimage involves a journey to a sacred place and is made for a fixed purpose, such as purification and forgiveness of sins. The attainment of this purpose is connected to an arrival at a sacred place. Hajj is a journey incumbent on every physically and financially able Muslim once in a lifetime. In Christianity, pilgrimage is a paradigm for the way the people of God live their lives. Hajj and the Christian pilgrimage lead to a sacred place and have a predetermined purpose. The hajj leads to Ka’bah. The Christian pilgrimage leads to a number of churches and basilicas. This article attempts a comparative study of the practice of pilgrimage between Christianity and Islam, not only identifying and highlighting the similarities and contrasts in the practice, but also showing the implications and applications of the parallels and differences within the Nigerian context. The article engages with a comparison of scriptural bases for the practice, its status, origin, timing, location, rites involved, and spiritual benefits. The article is anchored on historical, descriptive, and analytical methods using Christian and Islamic scriptures, history, and literature. It finds that while hajj is conditionally compulsory for Muslims, the Christian pilgrimage is voluntary unless imposed as a penance and it happens in many locales at any time; the Nigerian government’s sponsorship of pilgrims violates this status. This has, indubitably, led to corrupt practices in the pilgrimage administration in the country. Thus, the disengagement of governments at all levels from the sponsorship of pilgrimages is recommended.