Are Positive Group Affective Tone and Task Complexity Moderat ...

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  • Title: Are Positive Group Affective Tone and Task Complexity Moderating Variables in the Relationship between Team Cohesiveness and Team Performance (Inverted U)?
  • Author(s): Hastuti Naibaho
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: Organization Studies
  • Journal Title: Organizational Cultures: An International Journal
  • Keywords: Cohesiveness, Performance, Group Affective Tone, Task Complexity, Inverted U-Shape
  • Volume: 18
  • Issue: 1
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2327-8013 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2327-932X (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2327-8013/CGP/v18i01/43-52
  • Citation: Naibaho, Hastuti. 2018. "Are Positive Group Affective Tone and Task Complexity Moderating Variables in the Relationship between Team Cohesiveness and Team Performance (Inverted U)?." Organizational Cultures: An International Journal 18 (1): 43-52. doi:10.18848/2327-8013/CGP/v18i01/43-52.
  • Extent: 10 pages

Abstract

There are two potential moderating variables that can affect the inverted U-shaped relationship between work team cohesiveness and work team performance, which are positive group affective tone (PGTA) and task complexity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the moderating effects of positive group affective tone and task complexity on the inverted U-shaped relationship between work team cohesiveness and work team performance. The sample consists of 414 individuals from 90 works team in 12 companies within the manufacturing and services sectors. There are two hypotheses proposed in this study. The first hypothesis is that positive group affective tone may moderate the U-shaped relationship between work team cohesiveness and team performance. The coefficient associated with this interaction term is statistically significant (p-value < .05); thus, hypothesis one is supported. Hypothesis two suggests that task complexity may moderate the U-shaped relationship between work team cohesiveness and team performance. To test the hypothesis, this study employs the quadratic-by-linear interaction (cohesiveness2 x task complexity) in the regression equation. The coefficient associated with this interaction term is not statistically significant (p-value > .05); hence, the second hypothesis is not supported. The findings support the U-shaped relationship between work team cohesiveness and team performance. The quadratic term is significantly (negatively) related to team performance (β = –.392, p-value < .01).