A Sociocultural Insight to Feminist Activist Sustainable Citizenship

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  • Title: A Sociocultural Insight to Feminist Activist Sustainable Citizenship
  • Author(s): Yulia Maleta
  • Publisher: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Collection: Common Ground Research Networks
  • Series: On Sustainability
  • Journal Title: The International Journal of Sustainability in Economic, Social, and Cultural Context
  • Keywords: Citizen, Activism, Feminist, Justice, Social, Cultural, Economic, Politic
  • Volume: 14
  • Issue: 2
  • Year: 2018
  • ISSN: 2325-1115 (Print)
  • ISSN: 2325-114X (Online)
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.18848/2325-1115/CGP/v14i02/31-44
  • Citation: Maleta, Yulia . 2018. "A Sociocultural Insight to Feminist Activist Sustainable Citizenship." The International Journal of Sustainability in Economic, Social, and Cultural Context 14 (2): 31-44. doi:10.18848/2325-1115/CGP/v14i02/31-44.
  • Extent: 14 pages

Abstract

This article considers the active role of the female citizen within sustainable advocacy. The notion of being an advocate or an activist relates to social, cultural, economic, and political dimensions, in which I locate sustainable citizenship through social and environmental justice, social change, equality, ethical understandings of humanity and the natural world, and renewable technologies (Gaard 2001, 2011; Carter 2013; Caldicott 2014, 2017). Ecofeminist and environmental justice scholarship contextualizes women’s struggle to exercise environmental active citizenship within patriarchal economic hierarchies (Rankin and Gale 2003; Mallory 2006; Smith and Pangsapa 2008; Spitzner 2009; Walby 2011; Maleta 2015). Uneven social dimensions of gender, class, status, power, and ethnicity/race have influenced the global environmental justice movement and the challenge of equal citizenship (Doyle 2005; Horton 2006; Carter 2007; Barry 2008; Clements 2008). Grassroots ecological activists around the world struggle for social justice against a background of economic opportunism and exploitation (Stein 2004; Mellor 2009; Maleta 2011a, 2011b; Cockburn 2012). Although citizenship is historically connected with masculinity/men, women’s activism is challenging gender representations. Feminism also challenges current governance structures. The article concludes that women grassroots campaigners and politicians of diverse sociocultural backgrounds play a strong leadership role in the future of sustainable citizenry. Also, the greater unity of women in the global North and South is a stage for renewables economic reforms (Shiva 2014, 2016).