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Ubiquitous Learning and Instructional Technologies

Learning Module

Abstract

With presentations by leading researchers into technology innovation at the University of Illinois, this learning module explores the future of learning in an environment of ubiquitous technology-mediated communication. Bill Cope pushes the boundaries of possibility with his five propositions about the future of learning. Cris Mayo explores the gendered aspects of technology and ways in which we can critically engage with technologies in education. Chad Lane explores the dynamics of technology-mediated learning in games and museums. Maya Israel introduces the challenges and opportunities of teaching computer science.

Keywords

e-Learning, Educational Technologies

Learning Anywhere, Anytime - Bill Cope

For the Participant

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Comment: In what ways does technology mediated learning change both learning in person and learning at a distance? Discuss other participants' comments by mentioning them @name.

Make an Upate: Find an example of a learning technology which genuine makes a difference to the dynamics of learning. Describe it, and analyze the ways in which it makes a difference.

For the Instructor

Technology as a Social Relation in Online Pedagogy - Cris Mayo

For the Participant

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Comment: Discuss one stand-out idea from Cris Mayo's presentation.

Make an Update: Raise an issue about technology and gender. Provide examples and discuss implications.

For the Instructor

Repositioning Assessment and Instruction - Bill Cope

For the Participant

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See also this article on the potentials of big data.

Comment: How might it be possible to overcome some of the limitations of legacy assessment systems?

Make an Update: Take one aspect of big data in education. How does it work? What are its effects?

For the Instructor

The Orchestration of Learning Activities - H Chad Lane

For the Participant

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Comment: What are the lessons educators can learn from games?

Make an Update: "Parse" an educational game or museum experience. How does it work to support the learning process.

For the Instructor

The Nature of Classroom Learning - Bill Cope

For the Participant

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Comment: In what ways can computer-mediated learning environments support more active learning?

Make an Update: Describe and analyze an example of social learning supported by ubiquitous learning devices.

For the Instructor

Computer Science for All - Maya Israel

For the Participant

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Comment: What are the challenges and opportunities associated with learning computer coding?

Make an Update: Describe and evaluate a program, platform or pedagogy for increasing the understanding of how computing works.

For the Instructor

Setting Goals and Measuring Outcomes in Ubiquitous Learning Environments - Bill Cope

For the Participant

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Comment: How does the "logic" of assessment influence the logic of education?

Make an Update: Describe and evaluate an innovative assessment approach or technology.

For the Instructor

Peer Reviewed Work 1: Educational Theory

For the Participant

Take one of the theories or theoretical concepts introduced in this course. Or explore a related theory or concept of your own choosing that is relevant to the course themes. Outline the theory or define the concept referring to the theoretical and research literature, and illustrate the significance of the theory using examples of this concept at work in pedagogical practice.

A theory work should be 2000 words or more in length. Ideally it should include media such as images, diagrams, tables, embedded videos (either uploaded into Scholar, or embedded from other sites), web links and other digital media. Be sure to source all material that is quoted or otherwise used. Each work must have references “element” or section, including references to at least five scholarly articles or books, plus any other necessary or relevant references, including to websites and other media.

Following is the educational theory rubric, against which others will review your work, and against which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft. You can view this rubric while you draft your work at Creator => Feedback => Reviews => Rubric. The rubric explores four main knowledge processes, the background and rationale for which is described in the papers at this page.

 

For the Instructor

Peer Reviewed Work 2A: Case Study of an Educational Technology

For the Participant

Write a case study of an innovative learning practice—a method, a resource or a technology, for instance. This could be a reflection practice you have already used, or a new or unfamiliar practice which you would like to explore. Analyze an educational practice, or an ensemble of practices, as applied in a clearly specified a learning context. Use theory concepts introduced in this course. Use as theory concepts defined by members of the group in their published Work 1, with references and links to the published works of the other course participants.

Following is the educational practice rubric, against which others will review your work, and against which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft. You can view this rubric while you draft your work at Creator => Feedback => Reviews => Rubric. The rubric explores four main knowledge processes, the background and rationale for which is described in the papers at this page.

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For the Instructor

Peer Reviewed Work 2B: Design a Learning Module

For the Participant

Create a learning module in Scholar which demonstrates how you would translate some of the ideas and principles of this course into practice. A learning module is a hybrid work which crosses the legacy educational practices of lesson plan, syllabus and textbook. Unlike a lesson plan which is mainly written for a teacher’s design purposes, a learning module has both teacher and learner sides. On the left side of the screen you speak to learners in “classroom discourse,” however in the case of the learning module, in a dialogical mode, rather like social media. On the right side of the screen, you speak to other teachers in the professional discourse of the curriculum and pedagogy. Unlike a syllabus, a learning module contains content as well as an outline of coverage. And unlike a textbook which typically summarizes and transmit content that learners are to consume and remember, a learning module curates a variety of web content (links, embedded media etc.) and establishes a dialogue with and between learners which positions them as active seekers and producers of knowledge.

Your learning module should:

  1. have a clear rationale in terms of learning objectives and, if applicable, curriculum standards.
  2. include at least 8 updates, each of which on the left side includes at least some curated media and a comment request that will prompt rich dialogue among students, and on the right side speaks to teachers about the underlying pedagogical rationale, possible supplementary resources, teaching suggestions, and standards mapping.
  3. include least one peer reviewed project, with peer assessment rubric.
  4. include at least one information or knowledge survey.
  5. demonstrate pedagogical coherence and completeness. Optionally, creators could use the Learning by Design pedagogy, described here.
  6. be well formed in terms of the learning module two column format and heading structure, with all media and other curated content fully sourced.

For model K-12 learning modules, visit the Literacies and Learning by Design collections in the Scholar Bookstore. For model college and higher education learning modules, visit the Higher Education collection. For a selection of learning modules created by participants in the Learning Design and Leadership program, visit that collection. For instructions on how to create a Learning Module in Scholar, visit section 5 of the Scholar Help area.

Following is the peer review rubric for the learning module, against which others will review your work, and against which you will do your self-review at the completion of your final draft. You can view this rubric while you draft your work at Creator => Feedback => Reviews => Rubric. The rubric explores four main knowledge processes, the background and rationale for which is described in the papers at this page. If you want to use the L-by-D icons to mark activity types explicitly, you can copy and paste web icons located at this link.

 

For the Instructor