Produced with Scholar
Icon for Bluebell Learners 2018

Bluebell Learners 2018

Values, Giving and the Growth Mindset

Learning Module

Abstract

In this learning module, kindergarten students learn about giving through bucket filling. They explore values of respect and responsibility in the classroom and in the playground, and develop their unit/class code of cooperation. They also learn about growth mindset.

Keywords

Giving, Relationships, Social Skills, Literature, Cooperation, Belonging.

Australian Curriculum

This learning module is based on the Australian Curriculum.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY - Level 1b

Self-awareness - Typically by the end of Foundation Year, students:

Recognise emotions

  • identify a range of emotions and describe situations that may evoke these emotions

Understand themselves as learners

  • identify their abilities, talents and interests as learners

Self-management - Typically by the end of Foundation Year, students:

Express emotions appropriately

  • express their emotions constructively in interactions with others

Develop self-discipline and set goals

  • follow class routines to assist learning

Social awareness - Typically by the end of Foundation Year, students:

Appreciate diverse perspectives

  • acknowledge that people hold many points of view

Contribute to civil society

  • describe ways they can help at home and school

Understand relationships

  • explore relationships through play and group experiences

Social management - Typically by the end of Foundation Year, students:

Work collaboratively

  • share experiences of cooperation in play and group activities

Make decisions

  • identify options when making decisions to meet their needs and the needs of others

Negotiate and resolve conflict

  • listen to others’ ideas, and recognise that others may see things differently from them

Develop leadership skills

  • identify ways to take responsibility for familiar tasks at home and school

ETHICAL UNDERSTANDING - Level 1

Understanding ethical concepts and issues - Typically by the end of Foundation Year, students:

Recognise ethical concepts

  • identify ethical concepts arising in familiar contexts, such as good and bad behaviours

Reasoning in decision making and actions - Typically by the end of Foundation Year, students:

Reason and make ethical decisions

  • identify examples from stories and experiences that show ways people make decisions about their actions

Exploring values, rights and responsibilities - Typically by the end of Foundation Year, students:

Examine values

  • identify values that are important to them

Explore rights and responsibilities

  • share examples of rights and responsibilities in given situations

Consider points of view

  • express their own point of view and listen to the views of others

ENGLISH

Oral language

Listen to and respond orally to texts and to the communication of others in informal and structured situations (ACELY 1646) through:

  • Sharing prior knowledge of the topic
  • Participating in book orientation and reading activities
  • Small group and class sharing of ideas about 'belonging' and 'giving'

Connecting with text

Identify connections between texts and their personal experience (Foundation Year Achievement Standard) by:

  • Comparing and contrasting real elephants and story characters
  • Identifying the values demonstrated by the elephants in the story, and link to own worlds

Analysing texts

Identify some features of texts including events and characters and retell events from a text (ACELT1578) by:

  • Comparing and contrasting the actions of characters at different times in the story

Share feelings and thoughts about the events and characters in texts (ACELT1783) by: 

  • Hypothesising about the behaviours of the elephants, and linking to own behaviours

Applying values

Value relationships and friendships, recognising how words and actions can help or hurt others, and recognise the effects of modifying their behaviour (for example, discussing the effects of characters’ words and actions on others in texts).

Understand that language can be used to explore ways of expressing needs, likes and dislikes (ACELA 1429).

Reportable Outcomes:

  • recognises how their words and actions can help or hurt others
  • tries hard and uses strategies to meet and overcome challenges in their learning 

1.1: Filling Buckets

For the Student

Fig 1.2: We love bucket filling!

Learning Intention: To understand what a bucket filler is.

Success Criteria:

  • I can listen to the story and participate in class discussions.
  • I can contribute to a Y chart (what does bucket filling look like, sound like, feel like).

Activity:

  • Listen to the story 'Have you Filled a Bucket Today?' 
  • Answer teacher questions about the book and try to participate in class discussion 
  • Y Chart and Think-Pair-Share: What does bucket filling: look like (add to Y chart), sound like (add to Y chart), and feel like (add to Y chart)

Learning Intention: To understand the reading strategy connecting and what it means to be a bucket filler.

Success Criteria: 

  • Share a personal connection to the text about a time when you filled someone's bucket.

Activity: 

Listen to the teacher explain and model what the strategy 'connecting' means.

Make personal connections to the story in a circle time using the sentence starter 'I was a bucket filler when I....' 

Fig. 2: Have You Filled a Bucket Today?

For the Teacher

Purpose: The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to the concept of bucket filling and its effects through the focus text, 'Have you filled your bucket today?'Teaching Tips

Teaching Tips:

The open-ended questions are designed to encourage students to think about the text and respond.

Making personal connections to the text is an important reading strategy to use when comprehending new texts 

Ask students questions:

  • What are you thinking about after listening to this book?
  • How did it make you feel?
  • What does a full bucket symbolise/mean?
  • How can you get a full bucket?
  • If you fill someone's bucket, why does yours become full too?
  • What sort of person do you want to be? A bucket filler or bucket dipper? Why?

Explicitly teach the cooperative learning strategy of Think-Pair-Share: Give students sufficient thinking time and encourage students to close eyes. Model how to turn knee to knee to someone near them and show partner you are listening. Model how to share with partner.

Resources

  • Y-chart 
  • Questions 
  • Text: 'Have you Filled a Bucket Today?'

1.2: Filler and Dipper Role Plays

For the Student

​Learning Intention: To understand the difference between a bucket filler and a bucket dipper.

Success Criteria:

  • I can help the teacher sort bucket filling and dipping pictures/examples.
  • I can contribute to and participate in a group role play giving examples of bucket filling and bucket dipping. 
  • I can watch other groups role plays.
  • I can identify bucket filling and dipping examples and discuss the differences and the effects of each.

Activity: 

  • Help the teacher sort bucket filling and dipping pictures/examples on the smartboard and participate in class discussion about how you know it is filling or dipping. 
  • With the teacher, look at/read the role play scenario/problem card provided with your group.
  • Discuss with your group how a) a bucket filler would solve the problem or react b) how a bucket dipper would solve the problem or react. 
  • Create a short role play for each and perform to class. 
  • When not performing, watch other role plays and contribute to class discussions about bucket filling and dipping and which is more effective in each scenario.
How can we be bucket fillers?

For the Teacher

Purpose: The purpose of this activity is for students to deepen their understanding of bucket filling by identifying the difference between filling and dipping and discussing the positive impact that bucket filling has on themselves and others.

Activity: 

  • Use a concept attainment/sorting activity on the smartboard with pictures of bucket filling and bucket dipping. Ask students to help you sort them into the columns and ask questions: How do you know this is bucket filling/bucket dipping? What information in the picture tells you this? What can you see on the persons face that shows how they feel? 
  • Model how to work with a group to create and perform a small role play of bucket filling or bucket dipping, using a particular scenario (role play scenario cards).
  • Organise students into groups and with each group explain their scenario to them
  • Tell students that they need to first think about and discuss what a bucket filler would do. Then tell them to think about and discuss what a bucket dipper would do. 
  • Provide students with some time to further discuss, create and practise their short role play to perform to the class. 
  • After each role play, ask questions: How did you feel when you were a bucket filler? How do you think the other person felt? How did you feel when you were a bucket dipper? How do you think the other person felt? 

Teaching Tips

  • Explicitly teach students how to be a good (bucket filling) audience member when observing role plays - watching, listening, encouraging (showing respect)
  • Ask students what they have learned from doing and watching the role plays?
  • Make a teacher reflection at the end of the lesson: when you do something nice to someone, it makes them feel good and makes you feel good too. Sometimes they might do something nice back to you.

Resources:

  • Interactive smartboard sorting activity with pictures 
  • Role play scenario cards 
Giving Picture Sort

 

1.3 How does it make you feel?

For the Student

Learning Intention: To understand the author's message in a text.

Learning Intention: To understand how being a bucket filler and/or dipper makes you feel and how it makes others feel .

Success Criteria: 

  • I can listen carefully to the story 'The Rainbow Fish'.
  • I can think about what the message in the story is.
  • I can reflect on how you and others feel when you bucket fill/dip.
  • I can communicate your thoughts in class discussions and drawings. 

Activity:

  • Listen to the story of 'The Rainbow Fish'.
  • Think-Pair-Share: What is the message in the story? (What is the author trying to tell us?)
  • Make another connection, this time to the text 'The Rainbow Fish'. Think about a time when you filled someone else's bucket. Then think about how it made you feel. Then think about how it made the other person feel. 
  • Draw a picture of your connection and next to it draw a facial expression to show how you felt, and a facial expression to show how the other person felt. 

 

Fig. 1.3: The Rainbow Fish

 

For the Teacher

Purpose: The purpose of this task is for students to understand that authors write for real purposes and that books can hold a special message for us. It is also to identify that there are only winners when it comes to acts of bucket filling; both the person doing the bucket filling and the person being bucket filled.

Activity:

  • Read the story 'The Rainbow Fish'.
  • Run a Think-Pair-Share: What is the message in the story? (What is the author trying to tell us?)
  • Tell students they will be practising the reading strategy 'connecting'. Remind students about what this strategy is and give an example.  
  • Model to students how to complete the connecting and drawing of facial expressions activity/worksheet  

Teaching Tips

  • Talk students through drawing their pictures and provide opportunities to discuss how they felt when they bucket filled. If students are having troubles remembering a time, give them an opportunity to fill a bucket in that moment (eg. say something nice to someone, share their pencils with the person next to them). 
  •  Students should come to the conclusion that when you fill someone's bucket you feel good about yourself and the other person feels good too. Only good things come from bucket filling - everybody wins. 

Resources

  • Text: 'The Rainbow Fish' 
  • Activity/worksheet for student connections and pictures (see worksheet below)
    How does being a bucket filler make me and others feel?

     

 

1.4: A Random Act of Kindness

 

For the Student

 

Fig 1.5: Kindness is a BIG thing

Learning Intention: To understand how to BE a bucket filler. 

Success Criteria:

  • I can discuss ways in which you could fill someone's bucket and add to a class list/brainstorm. 
  • I can practise random acts of kindness to a member of the class.
  • I can reflect on how this made you feel and them feel. 

Activity: 

  • Participate in a sea-saw activity, where you share with a partner the many ways you could fill someone else's bucket.
  • Contribute your sharings to a whole class discussion/list which can be later referred to for ideas.
  • Practise 'random acts of kindness' to your secret class member and try to fill their bucket each day.
  • Participate in a circle time at the end of each day about a) how you filled someone's bucket and b) how this made you feel and c) how you think this may have made them feel.

For the Teacher

Purpose: The purpose of this activity is for students to put into practise their understanding of 'Bucket Filling' and to learn how to fill their friends buckets and hopefully extend this to all other students, class, unit, wider school community and at home. 

Teaching Tips:

  • Every morning ask students in a circle time format, what their act of bucket filling might be. 
  • At the end of the school day re-form as a circle to share acts of bucket filling and reflect on the effects. Emphasise bucket filling in the playground.

Resources:

  • 'Random act of kindness examples/list for students to refer to and continuously get ideas'
  • An organised list of who students' secret person will be - think about pairing students up with children they would not usually work with 

 

1.5: The Learning Pit

For the Student

Learning Intention: To understand that not giving up when things are hard can help my learning.

Success Criteria:

  • I can watch and talk about two videoclips about not giving up when things are hard.
  • I can talk about words to add to our class drawing of a learning pit.
  • I can words to my picture of a learning pit.
  • I can be a bucket filler and give feedback to another student
  • I can talk about what I have learnt.

Setting goals and achieving them can be hard sometimes. If you wanted to become better at throwing a ball or roller skate, but found it too hard, would you give up? Watch this video to see what happens on Sesame Street.

Media embedded December 6, 2017

Think-Pair-Share: With a partner, discuss:

  • What things are hard on the videoclip?
  • What do the puppets do?
  • What things are hard for you?
  • What things are hard for you in your learning at school?
  • What things do you do when learning ....... is hard? (insert the thing that is hard for you)
  • Is it okay to say I am not sure or I don't know?
  • Can doing hard things make you smarter?

The Learning Pit

Whole class activity: When you are facing a hard problem, it's like you are in a learning pit. Look at the picture of the learning pit and talk about the words you think should go in the speech bubbles.

Now watch Giraffes Can't Dance by Giles Andreae

Media embedded December 7, 2017

Think-Pair-Share:

  • What was hard for Gerald?
  • In the beginning were the other animals bucket fillers or bucket dippers? 
  • Did Gerald give up?
  • What did Gerald do to learn to dance?
  • Did the other animals change at the end of the story? Were they bucket fillers or bucket dippers?

Learning Pit

Cut out the sentence strips and paste them on your picture of Gerald in the learning pit. Show your drawing to a partner. Be a bucket filler and tell them one thing you liked about their picture.

Whole class reflection: Why is not giving up and trying hard important at school? Why is it important at home? When else is it important?

For the Teacher

Purpose: In this update students learn about not giving up and about the learning pit where challenges are faced and overcome.

Teaching Tips:

There are lots of resources and images of learning pits - also see Pinterest. Once you have co-created a learning pit with the class, display it so it can be referred to throughout the year. The Learning Pit approach is being used across the school. At any time, use the diagram to reflect on strategies students can use to help them climb out of the learning pit. For example, when applying the values, struggling with maths, reading or spelling, identify specific mathematical, comprehension or spelling strategies to help them. Focus could also be made on personal qualities such as perseverance or changing mind sets.

The Learning Pit Template

 Ashleigh - add new Learning Pit Template and Gerald Learning Pit template

 

2.1: Experiencing Respect

For the Student

Learning Intention: To understand what it means to be respectful and how it links to bucket filling. 

 Success Criteria:

  • I can brainstorm what you think it means to be respectful.
  • I can listen to the story and think about ways that the characters do show and do not show respect.
  •  I can participate in class discussion about what it means to be respectful.

 Activity:

  • Contribute to class brainstorm about what the term 'Be Respectful' means/might mean. Think about whether many of these things are like bucket filling. 
  • Listen to the story 'Mr Pusskins' Think-Pair-Share: In what ways did Emily show respect to Mr Pusskins? Did Mr Pusskins show Emily respect at the start of the story? What did he learn when he left Emily? 
  • Participate in a class discussion/questions about: How can we be respectful at school? How can we be respectful at home? Why is it important to be respectful? What would happen if we did not be respectful ourselves? What would happen if we did not be respectful to others?
Fig. 2.1: Mr Pusskins

For the Teacher

Purpose: For students to understand what it is to be respectful and recognise similarities between this and bucket filling. Students will begin to apply their understanding of being respectful to real life situations and hopefully practise being respectful in the classroom, on the playground and at home. 

Teaching Tips

  • Conduct a class brainstorm asking students to contribute their ideas about what it means to be respectful.
  • Read story 'Mr Pusskins' to students.
  • Ask students questions and conduct a Think-Pair-Share. 
  • Regularly read other texts relating to being respectful. Some examples are 'Franklin is Bossy' and 'Piggybook' (also used to teach responsibility), 'first look at' books. 
  • Display class brainstorm about being respectful to refer back to in the classroom. Display the words 'Be Respectful' in the classroom and tell students that this is a Gordon Primary School value. Talk to students about Gordon Gold Awards (Respect, Honesty, Tolerance, Responsibility). 

Resources

Awards: show students what Gordon Gold awards look like

2.2: Understanding Respect

For the Student

Learning Intention: To understand different ways to be respectful. 

Success Criteria: 

  • I can make connections.
  • I can share ideas about how to be respectful.
  • I can demonstrate three different ways you could be respectful.

Activity:

  • Listen to a short story or clip about being respectful.
  • Make connections to the story or video: think about a time when you have been respectful.
  • Share your connection with the class in a circle time. 
  • Contribute to a class list of all the different ways that you can be respectful. 
  • Demonstrate understanding of different ways to be respectful at home, in the classroom and on the playground (worksheet provided in teacher section).
  • Discuss and explain drawings/examples with the class and add any further ideas to class list.
Media embedded December 7, 2017

For the Teacher

 Purpose: For students to understand HOW they can be respectful to others. In this lesson students will brainstorm many different ideas on how they have been respectful in the past and how they can continue to be respectful in the classroom, on the playground and at home. The purpose of the class discussions and the worksheet is to provide students with a 'menu' to work from - to give them new ideas of how to be respectful in different settings. 

Teaching Tips:

  • Encourage students to now USE the different ways to be respectful at home, in the classroom and on the playground.
  • Use a circle time or verbal exit passes for students to reflect each day on how they have been respectful (eg. I can be respectful when I... ).

Resources:

  • Worksheet/activity attached: How can I be respectful at home, in the classroom and on the playground?
How can I be respectful?

 

2.3: Analysing Respect

For the Student

Learning Intention: To understand how being respectful makes me and others feel.

Success Criteria:

  • I can think about a time when I have been respectful on the playground and share in a circle time.
  • I can complete a worksheet when I was respectful on the playground. 
  • I can describe how I felt and how the other person felt.

Activity: 

  • Think about a time when you have been respectful on the playground and share in a circle time.
  • Complete worksheet (provided in teacher section) and discuss with class.
Fig. 2.3: How can you show respect when you are playing games?

For the Teacher

 Purpose: The purpose of this lesson is for student to understand how being respectful makes themselves feel as well as how it makes others feel. This is an opportunity to explore also what would happen if no one in the world was respectful - what sort of world would be live in? This lesson is to reinforce the importance of being respectful at school and at home and in the wider community. 

Teaching Tip: 

  • Ask students to think about a time on the playground when they had been respectful. Students complete a drawing of this example on the worksheet provided and also reflect on how it made them feel and how it made others feel. 
  • Ask students questions: What would happen if no body was respectful? What do you think the world would look like? Do you think people would be happy or unhappy? Why is it important to be respectful? 

Resources:

Activity/worksheet attached: 

How does being respectful make myself and others feel?

 

 

2.4: Applying Respect

For the Student

Learning Intention: To set a personal goal about how I am going to be respectful to myself, to others and to property in our classroom and in the playground.

Success Criteria:

  • I can set a personal goal.
  • I can illustrate and write the goal.
  • I can reflect on the goal.

Activity

  • Circle Time: In our Circle Time, think about how you can be respectful in our class and on the playground. 
  • Watch the teacher for how to draw and write about this goal.
  • Draw a picture of how you could be respectful and have a go at writing a sentence: 'Today I will be respectful to...... by........' 
  • Reflection (later in the day): Did you achieve your goal. What could you do differently? 
Fig.2.4: When you write a goal down, it is more likely to happen.

For the Teacher

 ​Purpose: Students apply their learning about being respectful by setting a personal goal for how they will be respectful to themselves, to others and/or to property in the classroom and/or the playground.

Teaching Tips:

  • Model how to illustrate and write a sentence about the goal. Tell students a fact about goal setting: writing your goal down means that it is more likely to happen! Use the sentence starter 'I can be respectful to............... by...................' to make the goal specific and measurable. 
  • Conduct the Circle Time activity at the end of the day or after a break. The illustrations can be a prompt for their reflections on whether they achieved goals and to consider their next goal.
  • The personal goal setting throughout the learning module could occur every day or only twice during each week, depending on the needs of your students.
My Respect Goal

3.1: Experiencing Responsibility

For the Student

Learning Intention: To understand what is responsible behaviour.

Success Criteria:

  • I can share an idea about what you think it means to be responsible. 
  • I can listen to the teacher read the story.
  • I can identify the responsible behaviours in the story.

Activity:

What do you think the word 'responsibility' might mean? Share this with the class.

Look at the front cover of the story 'Piggybook'. What do you think the story might be about? (Think-Pair-Share)

Listen to your teacher read the story. Think about the different characters and what behaviours they are displaying. 

  • What does the mother do?
  • What does the father do?
  • What do the boys do?

For the Teacher

Purpose: For students to understand what it means to be responsible and to link this to their understanding of bucket filling. Students will begin to apply their understanding of responsibility to real life situations with the aim of practicing responsibility in the classroom, on the playground and at home. 

Teaching Tips:

  • Conduct a class brainstorm asking students to contribute their ideas about what it means to be responsible 
  • Read the story 'Piggybook' to students 
  • Ask students questions and conduct a Think-Pair-Share 

 

  • Regularly read other texts relating to responsibility, such as 'Franklin is Messy', 'In a Minute Mum'. 
  • Encourage the students to think about how they can apply their responsible behaviour to different environments or situations.
  • During fruit break read other texts that relate to honesty, such as ' Franklin Fibs', 'David gets in trouble', and 'The Cocky Who Cried Dingo.'

3.2: Understanding Responsibility

For the Student

Learning Intention: To understand what being responsible is.

Success Criteria:

  • I can share an example of how to be responsible in class.
  • I can participate in role play scenarios, exploring responsible behaviours.
  • I can discuss ideas.

Activity:

To be responsible means doing what you have agreed to do, without having to be asked all the time. This could be things like cleaning up after yourself, being sensible or helping someone else who looks like they might need help. 

Think-Pair-Share how you could be responsible in different situations.

  • At home
  • At school
  • On the playground
  • In the bathrooms

The teacher will record these and provide other examples for the role play activity. The teacher will assist the students with taking on the roles within the role play examples and talk them through a short scenario. Think about the scenario:

  • What could you do to be respectful in this situation?

For the Teacher

Purpose: Students develop their understanding or being responsible and demonstrate it through role plays.

Teaching Tips:

Encourage your students to think about how responsibility can be applied in different places and with different people. Record their Think-Pair-Share, as this can be revisited later on. 

Example scenarios (these can be adapted to suit your class group):

  • Mum has asked you to clean your room, but you don't want to. 
  • The teacher has asked you to take a note to the front office. You go to the bathroom instead.
  • Your friend asks you to come play on the playground and you leave your lunchbox out on the seats.
  • You see one of your friends throwing resources around the classroom and they tell you to join them.

 

  • Assist the students with their ideas by providing a sentence starter - "I can be responsible when I...."
  • Narrate the students through the role play scenarios, guiding their actions if needed.

3.3: Analysing Responsibility

For the Student

Learning Intention: To understand how being responsible can affect you and those around you.

Success Criteria:

  • I can share an idea about how being responsible can have a good/positive outcome.
  • I can share an idea about how not being responsible can have a bad/negative outcome.
Being responsible together!

Activity:

Think-Pair-Share something good/positive that could happen if we were responsible. Also, think about something bad/negative that could happen if we were not responsible. The teacher will be able to provide examples and record your answers into the T-chart.

Think about the different ways we could be responsible that were discussed earlier. 

If we all know how to be responsible, we can make our classroom, home and playground a safer and happier place for everyone.

 

 

For the Teacher

Purpose: In this activity students analyse the effects of being responsible in order to deepen their understanding of the concept.

Teaching Tips:

Guide the students through the Think-Pair-Share by providing examples for the students to explore.

  • If we clean our room when we are asked to, what might happen?
  • If we don't go straight to the front office with a note, what might happen?
  • If we don't help our friend when they ask, what might happen?
  • Adjust your examples to suit the class group.
  • Prompt the students' thinking using their recorded thoughts from 4.2: Understanding Responsibility.

Resources:

T-chart worksheet

Responsibility T-chart

3.4: Applying Responsibility

For the Student

Learning Intention: To set a personal goal about how I am going to be responsible in our classroom and in the playground.

Success Criteria:

  • I can set a personal responsibility goal.
  • I can illustrate my goal.
  • I can reflect on my responsibility goal.

Activity - Circle Time:

In our Circle Time, think about where you can be responsibile in our class and in the playground. 

Reflection (later in the day): Did you achieve your goal. What could you do differently? 

Can we add some of these responsible behaviours to our classroom Code of Cooperation?

Fig. 3.4: What does being responsible at school look like?

 

For the Teacher

​Purpose: 

Students apply their learning about how to be responsible through setting a personal goals for in the classroom and/or the playground. 

Teaching Tips

Conduct the Circle Time activity at the end of the day or after a break. The illustrations can be a prompt for their reflections on whether they achieved goals and to consider their next goal.

Throughout the learning module, take advantage of opportunities to add to/change the class/unit code of cooperation. 

Also link to "bucket filling" where relevant

4: Links to Positive Behaviours for Learning

For the Student

Learning Intention: To understand how giving, Gordon Gold Values and PBL expectations all help me achieve my Quality World Picture to be successful at school.

Success Criteria:

  • I can draw a picture of my quality world at school.
  • I can add giving and the values that I need to use.
  • I can add the expectations that I need to use.

Quality World Picture

Look at a teacher's quality world picture that would make her happy at school.

  • What to you see?
  • Why would it make your teacher happy?
  • Would it make you happy?

Think-Pair-Share: With a partner discuss:

  • What would make you happy at school?
  • Who else would be in your quality world picture?
  • What would you be doing to make sure you are learning?

Draw your quality world picture. Cut our the bubble words and glue them around your quality world picture.

### Diana to add image of quality world classroom

For the Teacher

Purpose: This activity explains how the school wide expectations of Positive Behaviours for Learning (PBL) help students be successful learners and how they link with the Gordon Gold Values and giving.

Teaching Tips:

It is expected that students have been learning about PBL throughout the term and will be familiar with the key ideas. Revise that the Gordon Gold Values help us make good choices in relation to our general behaviour and that the PBL expectations help us make good choices with our learning. PBL outlines 4 school wide expectations that make the expectations really clear and consistent for all teachers and students:

- Be Safe

- Be Respectful

- Be a Learner

- Be Responsible

Quality World Picture

Teacher provides a model drawing of their quality world picture. After students draw their picture, they cut out the values and expectations they need to use to achieve their quality world picture.

Quality World Picture
Bluebell Quality World Words

 

 

Acknowledgements

The original version of this learning module was written by Sue Gorman, Jessica Humphreys, Hayley Hinde, Aly Allpress and Alyssa Audsley.

Title: (Source);  Fig. 1.1a: (Source); Fig 1.1b: (Source]; Fig. 1.2: Sand Bucket (Source); Fig: 1.3: Cover of The Rainbow Fish (Source); Fig 1.4: (Source); Fig. 2.1: Cover of Mr Pusskins (Source);  Fig. 2.3: Children playing (Source); Fig. 2.4 (Source); ; Fig. 3.2: (Source); Fig. 3.3: (Source); Fig. 3.4: (Source).